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New loans: Hidroelectricity in Brazil

The following operations were approved in recent weeks by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC) and the Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF).

BRAZIL

A $75 million IDB loan and $300 million in syndicated funds for ITç Energética S.A. to construct, operate and maintain a private hydroelectric project in southern Brazil.

A $17 million IDB loan and $19 million in syndicated funds to finance a private sector project to expand, operate and maintain a 60-kilometer toll road in the state of Rio de Janeiro.

IDB loans for $6.5 million and a grant of $300,000 for technical cooperation to increase the availability of credit for low-income microentrepreneurs.

CHILE

A $2 million MIF grant to the Centro de Productividad Industrial to enhance the technical, managerial, and technological performance of small enterprises.

COLOMBIA

A $100 million IDB loan to help upgrade the secondary road network at the departmental level as well as improve the capabilities of the departments for road planning and management.

A $60 million IDB loan to support the consolidation and expansion of the municipal credit market to finance urban infrastructure.

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

A $32 million IDB loan to help the judicial system improve the institutional efficiency and transparency of real property adjudication and registration.

ECUADOR

Two IDB loans totaling $62 million to support greater access to housing for low-income groups.

EL SALVADOR

A $34.06 million IDB loan to finance improvements in economic and social infrastructure in the country's poorest municipalities.

GUATEMALA

A $930,000 MIF grant to strengthen capital markets by helping to develop a registry for securities transactions.

HONDURAS

A $6.55 million IDB concessional loan to improve the quality and coverage of basic education.

MEXICO

A $171 million IDB loan to improve middle school education in remote rural areas using television to overcome distances.

A $23.4 million IDB loan to help overcome barriers to the commercialization of activities to increase energy efficiency.

An $8 million IDB loan to strengthen the Banking and Securities Commission.

A $4 million MIF investment in a risk capital fund that will support small companies whose activities enhance the environment.

NICARAGUA

A $50 million IDB soft loan to support the fourth phase of a program to provide basic social infrastructure to the poorest sectors of the population.

A $40 million soft loan to help increase the productivity of small and medium-sized farms and contribute to the competitiveness of the food and agriculture sector.

PANAMA

Two IDB loans totaling $130.13 million for the sustained development of the financial sector.

A $2 million long-term MIF loan and a $250,000 technical cooperation grant to Multi Credit Bank, Inc. for credit to microenterprises and small businesses.

A $1.2 million MIF grant to help strengthen the country's securities commission to ensure a strong banking system, increase the diversity of the financial sector, and expand capital markets.

SURINAME

A $1,830,000 IDB grant to improve the tax system and help to harmonize the country's tax legislation and regulations with other countries in the Caribbean Community.

VENEZUELA

An $8 million IIC loan to Inversiones Selva, C.A., to increase the company's capacity to improve its operational and productive efficiency in high-quality disposable plastic products.

REGIONAL

A $240 million IDB loan to help build a 3,146-kilometer natural gas pipeline that will promote the integration of the Brazilian and Bolivian energy sectors, diversify energy sources and stimulate economic growth.

An idb nonreimbursable financing for $3,125,000 in local currencies for agricultural technological development and technology transfer in Latin America.

A MIF investment of $3.25 million and a MIF technical cooperation grant of $1.75 million to help establish the NGO Enterprise Development Fund, which will promote and support conservation ventures carried out by microenterprises and small businesses in Latin America and the Caribbean.

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