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Banco Agricola SME Financing Partnership
The proposed Banco Agricola SME Financing Partnership seeks to address the lack of availability of SME financing in El Salvador. IDB will join efforts with BA, the largest bank in the country, to provide financing to this segment, thus broadening the scope and reach of SME funding in the country.

Project Detail

Country

El Salvador

Project Number

ES-L1084

Approval Date

July 3, 2013

Project Status

Closed

Project Type

Loan Operation

Sector

PRIVATE FIRMS AND SME DEVELOPMENT

Subsector

SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISE

Lending Instrument

BID Invest

Lending Instrument Code

IIC

Modality

PSL (Private Sector Loan)

Facility Type

-

Environmental Classification

-

Total Cost

USD 100,000,000.00

Country Counterpart Financing

USD 0.00

Original Amount Approved

USD 90,000,000.00

Financial Information
Operation Number Lending Type Reporting Currency Reporting Date Signed Date Fund Financial Instrument
2958A/OC-ES Non-Sovereign Guaranteed USD - United States Dollar Ordinary Capital Private Sector Financing
2958A/OC-ES-1 Non-Sovereign Guaranteed USD - United States Dollar Ordinary Capital Private Sector Financing
2958A/OC-ES-2 Non-Sovereign Guaranteed USD - United States Dollar Ordinary Capital Private Sector Financing
2958B/OC-ES Non-Sovereign Guaranteed USD - United States Dollar Ordinary Capital Participant Financing
Operation Number 2958A/OC-ES
  • Lending Type: Non-Sovereign Guaranteed
  • Reporting Currency: USD - United States Dollar
  • Reporting Date:
  • Signed Date:
  • Fund: Ordinary Capital
  • Financial Instrument: Private Sector Financing
Operation Number 2958A/OC-ES-1
  • Lending Type: Non-Sovereign Guaranteed
  • Reporting Currency: USD - United States Dollar
  • Reporting Date:
  • Signed Date:
  • Fund: Ordinary Capital
  • Financial Instrument: Private Sector Financing
Operation Number 2958A/OC-ES-2
  • Lending Type: Non-Sovereign Guaranteed
  • Reporting Currency: USD - United States Dollar
  • Reporting Date:
  • Signed Date:
  • Fund: Ordinary Capital
  • Financial Instrument: Private Sector Financing
Operation Number 2958B/OC-ES
  • Lending Type: Non-Sovereign Guaranteed
  • Reporting Currency: USD - United States Dollar
  • Reporting Date:
  • Signed Date:
  • Fund: Ordinary Capital
  • Financial Instrument: Participant Financing

Can’t find a document? Request information

Implementation Phase
https://www.iadb.org/document.cfm?id=EZSHARE-6747282-14
Banco Agrícola SME Financing Partnership [37802013].PDF
Published Jan. 21, 2015
Download
https://www.iadb.org/document.cfm?id=EZSHARE-6747282-16
Asociación con Banco Agrícola para el Financiamiento de PYME [37802236].PDF
Published Jan. 21, 2015
Download
Preparation Phase
https://www.iadb.org/document.cfm?id=EZSHARE-1953259545-24767
Banco Agricola SME Financing Partnership (ES-L1084) - ESMR [37805717].PDF
Published May. 31, 2013
Download
https://www.iadb.org/document.cfm?id=EZSHARE-6747282-15
Banco Agricola SME Financing Partnership (ES-L1084) -ESS [37805738].PDF
Published May. 31, 2013
Download
https://www.iadb.org/document.cfm?id=EZSHARE-990176611-491
Banco Agricola SME Financing Partnership (ES-L1084) - Project Abstract [37805726].PDF
Published May. 31, 2013
Download

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