Skip to main content
Taua Solar Photovoltaic Pilot Project
The investment grant being requested from the Bank will contribute to reduce capital expenditures associated with equipment manufacturing, and infrastructure required for the implementation of the Project.

Project Detail

Country

Brazil

Project Number

BR-G1001

Approval Date

November 15, 2010

Project Status

Closed

Project Type

Investment Grants

Sector

-

Subsector

-

Lending Instrument

BID Invest

Lending Instrument Code

IIC

Modality

-

Facility Type

-

Environmental Classification

Likely to cause minimal or no negative environmental and associated social impacts

Total Cost

USD 3,320,000.00

Country Counterpart Financing

USD 3,020,000.00

Original Amount Approved

USD 300,000.00

Financial Information
Operation Number Lending Type Reporting Currency Reporting Date Signed Date Fund Financial Instrument
GRT/MC-12500-BR Non-Sovereign Guaranteed USD - United States Dollar Sustainable Energy and Climate Change In Grant
Operation Number GRT/MC-12500-BR
  • Lending Type: Non-Sovereign Guaranteed
  • Reporting Currency: USD - United States Dollar
  • Reporting Date:
  • Signed Date:
  • Fund: Sustainable Energy and Climate Change In
  • Financial Instrument: Grant

Can’t find a document? Request information

Preparation Phase
https://www.iadb.org/document.cfm?id=EZSHARE-1079845749-1616
Taua Project Abstract [36678815].PDF
Published Feb. 10, 2012
Download
https://www.iadb.org/document.cfm?id=EZSHARE-1079845749-1617
Taua Solar Final ESS [36678844].PDF
Published Feb. 10, 2012
Download

Have an Environmental or Social issue related to IDB projects? File a Complaint

Publications
Published 2024
Taxation when Markets are not Competitive: Evidence from a Loan Tax
We study the interaction of market structure and tax-and-subsidy strategies utilizing pass-through estimates from the unexpected introduction of a loan tax in Ecuador, a quantitative model, and a comprehensive commercial-loan dataset. Our model generalizes bank competition theories, including Bertrand-Nash competition, credit rationing, and joint-maximization. While we find the loan tax is distortionary, neglecting the possibility of non-competitive lending inflates estimated tax deadweight loss by 80% because non-competitive banks internalize some of the burden. Conversely, subsidies are less effective in non-competitive settings. If competition were stronger, tax revenue would be 10% lower. The findings suggest that policymakers should consider market structure in tax-and-subsidy strategies.
Publications
Published 2024
The Promises of Digital Bank Accounts for Low-income Individuals
The push for adopting digital modes of payment rests on three promises: increased efficiency of transactions, increased financial inclusion, and improvements in the financial well-being of low-income individuals. We experimentally test the extent to which these promises are fulfilled. We exploit the random assignment into an intervention to encourage direct deposits of recurrent government benefits into digital bank accounts in Colombia. Switching from cash to direct deposits reduces disbursement errors and increases access to benefits among eligible beneficiaries. It also increases the ownership of bank accounts, the demand for formal loans, and loan take-up among individuals without a financial history. However, we do not find evidence of improvements in financial well-being across any of our metrics.
Publications
Published 2023
MICI Reflections: Access to Remedy and Dispute Resolution: Contributions to the Conversation Based on MICI's Experience
The notion of remedy has gained importance and become a central issue on the international development agenda, despite accountability mechanisms and financial institutions have been subject to continued criticism in terms of their ability to provide effective remedy for communities claiming to be affected by development projects. This note aims to explore the role of alternative dispute resolution in access to remedy, and to specifically examine the contributions that MICIs Consultation Phase has made in providing solutions to communities that believe they have been adversely affected by IDB Group-financed development projects between 2017 and 2022.
Publications
Published 2023
President's Report 2023
IDB Report of the President 2023.
Publications
Published 2024
Latin America and the Caribbean Standardized Public Debt Database: Data as of June 2023
This database compiles current standardized statistics on sovereign debt issuances for the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region and contains biannual data starting in 2006 through June 2023. Sovereign debt data is classified by legislation, creditor, currency, and maturity, among other areas, for 26 LAC countries. The availability of valid, comparable, and standardized public debt data is essential for the implementation of sound policies. As such, at the core of the LAC Debt Group initiative is the development of a standardized sovereign debt database to help debt managers, policymakers, and other actors of financial markets analyze the evolution and composition of public debt in the region and conduct cross-country comparisons. LAC public debt offices provided the data in response to a questionnaire specifically designed to allow comparability. The questionnaire, whose response is non-compulsory, is intended to compile current standardized statistics for objective and homogeneous definitions of public debt.
Publications
Published 2022
A roadmap to the mobility and logistics trends that are reshaping Latin America and the Caribbean
Today, governments are acutely aware that merely building new infrastructure is not the solution, and they are seeking the IDB Groups assistance in designing smarter transportation services that will meet their peoples expectations. This document describes the five broad shifts that are driving the IDB Groups transportation portfolio: (i) the social dimension of transportation services; (ii) new institutional and regulatory arrangements; (iii) logistics performance; (iv) secure resources for maintaining transport infrastructure, and (v) the digital transformation.
Blogs
Published 2023
US Banking Fragilities and the Potential Impacts on Latin America and the Caribbean
Several bank failures, and the high volatility in US bank equity prices, have raised considerable concern in recent weeks. The March 10 failure of Silicon Valley Bank (SVB) followed just two days later by that of Signature Bank shocked many observers. There were hopes that these were isolated incidents, but other regional banks soon came
Blogs
Published 2022
Infraestrutura sustentável na recuperação econômica da América Latina e do Caribe
A infraestrutura desempenha um papel irrefutável no desenvolvimento e na atividade econômica dos países. Uma infraestrutura melhor impulsiona a atividade econômica, possibilita o intercâmbio de mercadorias, aumenta a qualidade de vida da população e facilita a mobilidade social. A infraestrutura é necessária para levar serviços básicos para a população, como acesso a água potável, serviços
Blogs
Published 2022
15 transformaciones para alcanzar la prosperidad libre de carbono
La crisis climática está pasando frente a nuestros ojos. Los efectos comenzaron a materializarse en las últimas décadas y ahora afectan a algunas de las comunidades más vulnerables de América Latina y el Caribe. Cumplir con los objetivos del Acuerdo de París es una tarea monumental. Para América Latina y el Caribe, esto supone redirigir entre el 7% y el 19% del PIB –hasta US$1,3 billones– del gasto público y privado al año hacia soluciones climáticas. Para ayudar en este esfuerzo, un nuevo informe del BID publicado hoy aclara lo que significa financiar la transición hacia la carbono-neutralidad. Ofrece una serie de opciones para que los gobiernos consideren e inicien la transición hacia un futuro próspero sin emisiones de carbono.
Publications
Published 2022
Allocative Efficiency of Government Spending for Growth in Latin American Countries
There is scant empirical economic research regarding the way that Latin American governments efficiently allocate their spending across different functions to achieve higher growth. While most papers restrict their analysis to the size of government, much less is known about the composition of spending and its implications for long-term growth. This paper sheds light on how allocating expenditures to investment in quality human and physical capital, and avoiding waste on inefficient expenditures, enhance growth in Latin America. This paper uses a novel dataset on physical and human capital and detailed public spending that includes -for the first time- Latin American countries, which is categorized by a cross-classification that provides the breakdown of government expenditure, both, by economic and by functional heads. The database covers 42 countries of the OECD and LAC between 1985 and 2017. There are five main results. First, the estimated growth equations show significant positive effects of the factors of production on growth and plausible convergence rates (about 2 percent). The estimated effect of the physical investment rate is positive and significant with a long-run elasticity of 1.2. Second, while the addition of years of education as a proxy for human capital tends to have no effect on growth, the addition of a new variable that measures quality-adjusted years of schooling as a proxy for human capital turns out to have a positive and significant effect across all specifications with a long-run elasticity of 1.1. However, if public spending on education (excluding infrastructure spending) is added to the factor specification, growth is not affected. This is mainly because, once quality is considered, spending more on teacher salaries has no effect on student outcomes. Therefore, the key is to increase quality, not just school performance or education spending. Third, both physical and human capital are equally important for growth: the effect of increasing one standard deviation of physical capital or human capital statistically has the same impact on economic growth. Fourth, increasing public investment spending (holding public spending constant) is positive and significant for growth (a 1% increase in public investment would increase the long-term GDP per capita by about 0.3 percent), in addition to the effect of the private investment rate. However, the effect of public spending on payroll, pensions and subsidies does not contribute to economic growth. Fifth, the overall effect of the size of public spending on economic growth is negative in most specifications. An increase in the size of government by about 1 percentage point would decrease 4.1 percent the long-run GDP per capita, but the more effective the government is, the less harmful the size of government is for long-term growth.
Powered by FindIT
Jump back to top