Improving the business climate in the Caribbean

March 25, 2011
Several IDB programs are helping the region diversify its economy and attract new investments The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is financing several programs to improve the business environment, foster diversification and enhance competitiveness in the Caribbean.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

September 27, 2010
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

Latin America and the Caribbean see slower growth in next four years

March 19, 2009
Latin American and Caribbean leaders expect per capita income to fall or grow moderately in the 2009–2012  period and governments to rely more on financing from international institutions, according to a survey by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The expectations contrast sharply with the recent economic performance in the region, where product per capita grew 4.1 percent annually in the past five years.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

February 26, 2009
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

The Arts of the Caribbean

August 24, 2007
A selection of 39 artworks by recognized Caribbean artists will be on display in a new art exhibit at the IDB. This vibrant exhibit coming from a collection of two thousand works, of the Organization of American States (OAS) Art Museum of the Americas, features paintings, sculptures, drawings, engravings and photographs by masters such as Amelia Peláez, Juan José Sicre and Mario Carreño. The selection centers on countries that represent the Spanish, English, French and Dutch speaking Caribbean, offering a broad perspective of the region.

The underserved low-income market in the Caribbean

May 25, 2007
Close to 90 percent of the population in the Caribbean––over 11 million people, mostly in Haiti, Jamaica and Suriname—has an annual income lower than $3,260 or under $300 a month measured in purchasing-power-parity (PPP) dollars. This startling statistics comes from a new report presented at the seminar Opportunities for the Majority (OM) in the Caribbean, held by the IDB in Montego Bay, Jamaica, on May 17—18.

Jamaica’s New Prime Minister Committed to Reaching the Majority

June 19, 2006
Jamaican Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller, the first woman to lead her country’s government, plans to invest more in early childhood education, basic shelter and job training to help improve the lives of the disadvantaged in her island nation.

Latinos from the Far East

March 01, 2006
By Charo QuesadaWhen Mexicans or Panamanians say they are “going to the Chino for groceries” they are not talking about some Chinese individual that happened to open a business around the corner from where they live. In their countries, the Chinese store has become an institution with a long tradition, providing a large and convenient selection of basic products, at low cost and with convenient business hours.

A home-grown solution for Latin America’s water crisis

March 01, 2006
By Luis Alberto Moreno*As delegates gathered at the IV World Water Forum in Mexico City earlier this month, many were asking whether the private sector still has a role to play in solving the critical sanitation problems of the developing world.