Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

May 30, 2012
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

IDB fuels impact investing in Latin America

February 13, 2012
More than $110 million of impact investing resources were mobilized by the IDB over the past 18 months to finance profitable projects that bring about social change Despite stellar economic performance in recent years, Latin America and the Caribbean still have a long way to go to address pressing development needs, such as reducing poverty, improving educational outcomes and enhancing access to reliable health services.

How to make energy efficient blue jeans

July 06, 2011
IDB financing for renewable energy paves the way for denim maker in Ecuador to boost output while cutting energy costs One of the oldest traditional textile manufacturers in Ecuador, La Internacional S.A., is not only looking for the latest trends in denim fashion, but also looking for ways to become more competitive and grow in a sustainable way.

Improving the business climate in the Caribbean

March 25, 2011
Several IDB programs are helping the region diversify its economy and attract new investments The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is financing several programs to improve the business environment, foster diversification and enhance competitiveness in the Caribbean.

IDB expects to provide more than $500 million to help Latin America and Caribbean prepare for natural disasters

March 10, 2011
Financial disaster preparedness is a growing concern in Latin America and the Caribbean. Last year the region saw devastating earthquakes in Chile and Haiti and an active hurricane season that impacted Central America and Mexico. In addition, the La Niña-related weather phenomenon has brought severe flooding to Venezuela, Colombia and Brazil, among others.

Latin America and the Caribbean see slower growth in next four years

March 19, 2009
Latin American and Caribbean leaders expect per capita income to fall or grow moderately in the 2009–2012  period and governments to rely more on financing from international institutions, according to a survey by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The expectations contrast sharply with the recent economic performance in the region, where product per capita grew 4.1 percent annually in the past five years.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

February 26, 2009
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

Water for the future

December 14, 2008
At the far southern margins of Quito, Ecuador’s capital city, the normal sequence of residential development has been turned on its head. Typically, the low-income neighborhoods that spring up on the outskirts of Latin America’s biggest cities follow a dismal pattern. First come the squatters who erect improvised shelters. Eventually the municipality plows basic dirt roads and individual families make structural improvements to their homes. Years later electricity cables and even telephone connections are installed.

Change in Habits?

December 28, 2007
By Diego Fonseca Ecuador indisputably holds first place in two different categories in Latin America. First, it is the top remittance-receiving Andean nation: some US$1.7 billion in 2005, equal to 4.8% of the country’s GDP. Second, its micro-lending market is one of the largest in the region. In 2005 alone, the country’s 61 regulated microfinance institutions approved more than US$1 billion in micro-loans, while 170 NGOs and 330 credit unions loaned another US$295 million.