IDB fuels impact investing in Latin America

February 13, 2012
More than $110 million of impact investing resources were mobilized by the IDB over the past 18 months to finance profitable projects that bring about social change Despite stellar economic performance in recent years, Latin America and the Caribbean still have a long way to go to address pressing development needs, such as reducing poverty, improving educational outcomes and enhancing access to reliable health services.

A capital challenge in Haiti

November 03, 2011
Until February 2011, Jean-Claude Seropian, a French hydraulic engineer, worked in Paris as director of operations of Suez Environnement, one of the world’s leading water and waste management companies. That month he moved to Haiti as head of a team of five technical, financial and management experts from Suez and two sister companies, Aguas de Barcelona and United Water. Their mission: to work with the staff of Port-au-Prince’s ailing water utility to arrest the decline of its services.

A water turnaround in Haiti

November 03, 2011
Before the project started in 2008, Saint Marc had running water for nine hours a week, at best. At present service is up to 10 hours a day—the highest average in any urban area in Haiti.

A small price to pay

November 03, 2011
GOMIER, Haiti – Danette François used to walk 30 minutes to fetch water from a well in this seaside village. The water was free but brackish and untreated. Her children often fell ill. She now spends a few minutes each day to fill a 5-gallon bucket of chlorinated water, paying a community-established fee of one gourde— the equivalent of two cents. “The price? It’s really cheap, like a gift,” said François, who has five children between the ages of 10 and 4. “I’m happy. My kids are not getting sick.”

Women entrepreneurs: too often trapped in the microenterprise ghetto

October 05, 2011
Innovative approaches can boost women’s economic presence among small business owners in Latin America and the Caribbean Over the past three decades, women in Latin America and the Caribbean have dramatically increased their role in the workforce. Currently, about half of women in the region are economically active, more than double the level in the 1970s. They have been elected presidents of several Latin American countries and often dominate the microenterprise and microfinance sector, providing an important contribution to regional economies.

IDB backs large infrastructure and natural resource projects in Latin America and the Caribbean

March 25, 2011
$5.4 billion in financing mobilized in the past four years for the region The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has provided $2.6 billion in loans to finance key private sector infrastructure and natural resource projects in Latin America and the Caribbean over the past four years and it has mobilized another $2.8 billion in financing for the region through its syndication program.

Improving the business climate in the Caribbean

March 25, 2011
Several IDB programs are helping the region diversify its economy and attract new investments The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is financing several programs to improve the business environment, foster diversification and enhance competitiveness in the Caribbean.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

September 27, 2010
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

MiBanco will boost loans to women microentrepreneurs with IDB backing

August 27, 2010
Mibanco – Banco de la Microempresa S.A. will increase microfinancing to women entrepreneurs in Peru with the equivalent of $36 million in Peruvian soles provided by the IDB’s syndicated loan program.

Happiness and violence in Argentina: crime victims tend to favor more lenient measures

February 15, 2010
Are you happy? Did you smile yesterday? Increasingly economists are putting emotional questions like these at the heart of their studies in an attempt to uncover the links between happiness, human behavior, beliefs and policies.  Though crime has received relatively little attention in happiness research, a new study by the Inter-American Development Bank provides surprising insights: Victims of crime are no less happy than others.