Former President Clinton's Address to the IDB Conference

October 01, 2009
Madame Prime Minister, President Moreno, friends, Good afternoon. Let me say that it was about three months ago that Prime Minister and President Préval asked me to organize this modest trade and investment event and President Moreno thought that it was a good idea, and here we are. 

IDB President on the Cancún Annual Meeting

March 10, 2009
IDB Annual Meetings often present an opportunity to set the course for the coming months and even years. What are some of the key issues at this annual meeting in Cancun?

Remarks by IDB President Luis Alberto Moreno at the Sports for Development Seminar

July 22, 2008
Good morning to everyone.  I would like to welcome all of you to the Inter-American Development Bank. The IDB believes in the power of sports to mobilize the private, public and non-profit sectors to have a positive impact on youth.  In the past two years, the Bank has invested over five million dollars in non-reimbursable financing for this type of initiatives. We believe that the skills learned on the soccer field can be transformed into skills for life and skills for employment.

Presentation to the Committee fro Economic Cooperation and Development of the German Parliament

June 18, 2008
Latin America and the Caribbean experienced solid growth in 2007, external indebtedness declined in relative terms, and international reserves have risen. However, inflationary expectations have started to mount, due in part to the increase in oil and food prices.

World Cocoa Foundation (WCF)<br> Bi-Annual Partnership Meeting<br> Washington, DC

October 04, 2006
Good Morning Ladies and Gentlemen.   I want to thank Bill Guyton and the World Cocoa Foundation for this opportunity to get acquainted and for the honor and pleasure of sharing this occasion with my friend and distinguished fellow speaker, Anne Venneman. I’m excited to be here today for the simple reason that you and I are in the same business—the business of sustainable development. The areas where cocoa is grown and harvested, with few exceptions, are areas marked by poverty, inadequate education and healthcare, and limited economic opportunity.

International conference for Haiti’s social and economic development

July 25, 2006
Opening Remarks As a long-standing partner of Haiti, the IDB is pleased to take part in this important conference, which ratifies the international community’s strong commitment to support the government’s vision and long-term development strategy. I welcome this opportunity to reiterate that the IDB supports the pursuit of a continued and coordinated donor approach led by the Haitian government, as well as a country-driven development process. IDB Support

Promoting Economic Opportunity in the Americas: IDB’s role

December 13, 2005
Greetings Good afternoon! It’s a great pleasure for me to visit the American Enterprise Institute for the first time in my new capacity as President of the Inter-American Development Bank. One of my main missions at the IDB is to transform it into a true “ideas bank”. I think there is much our institution can learn from successful ideas-driven organizations like the AEI, and I look forward to a closer relationship between our two institutions in the years ahead.

Enhancing the Partnership between Latin America & the Caribbean and Japan

November 29, 2005
Greetings and Introduction Mina sama. Kon ni chi uá!

International symposium on intelligent transportation systems in emerging economies

May 07, 2002
At this juncture, I am requested to make final comments about the INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS IN EMERGING ECONOMIES.

United Nations Special General Assembly on AIDS

June 27, 2001
AIDS is a challenge to development that affects every continent. The transformation of AIDS from health concern to global development issue reflects the rapidity with which HIV has spread and the magnitude of its economic and social consequences. It also underscores the need for quick, decisive, and sustained action. AIDS is radically changing our perspective on the need for cooperation because it cannot be stopped without a coordinated and collaborative global effort. That is why we are here today.