Fact sheet: The IDB and Haiti’s Caracol Industrial Park

July 06, 2012
The investment in the Caracol Industrial Park project is a key component of the Inter-American Development Bank’s efforts to support Haiti in building a vibrant economy that will provide its people with more employment opportunities and access to infrastructure and basic services. Given Haiti’s poverty rate of 78 percent, creating jobs is its government’s top priority.

Former President Clinton's Address to the IDB Conference

October 01, 2009
Madame Prime Minister, President Moreno, friends, Good afternoon. Let me say that it was about three months ago that Prime Minister and President Préval asked me to organize this modest trade and investment event and President Moreno thought that it was a good idea, and here we are. 

IDB President on the Cancún Annual Meeting

March 10, 2009
IDB Annual Meetings often present an opportunity to set the course for the coming months and even years. What are some of the key issues at this annual meeting in Cancun?

Remarks by IDB President Luis Alberto Moreno at the Sports for Development Seminar

July 22, 2008
Good morning to everyone.  I would like to welcome all of you to the Inter-American Development Bank. The IDB believes in the power of sports to mobilize the private, public and non-profit sectors to have a positive impact on youth.  In the past two years, the Bank has invested over five million dollars in non-reimbursable financing for this type of initiatives. We believe that the skills learned on the soccer field can be transformed into skills for life and skills for employment.

Presentation to the Committee fro Economic Cooperation and Development of the German Parliament

June 18, 2008
Latin America and the Caribbean experienced solid growth in 2007, external indebtedness declined in relative terms, and international reserves have risen. However, inflationary expectations have started to mount, due in part to the increase in oil and food prices.

IDB and Energy

March 27, 2008
The Inter-American Development Bank’s energy portfolio includes a wide array of investments aimed at improving the energy security of its member countries by exploiting both conventional and renewable sources. In 2007 the Bank approved US$2.5 billion in energy-related operations. Many of these loans will support high-priority gas and electricity infrastructure projects. For example, the IDB approved: A US$32.7 million loan for a wide-ranging investment program to strengthen Nicaragua’s electricity system.

IDB in Brief

March 24, 2008
The Inter-American Development Bank was created in 1959 to help accelerate the economic and social development of its member countries in Latin America and the Caribbean and to promote regional integration. The Bank has 47 member countries: 28 in the Western Hemisphere, 16 in Europe, as well as Israel, Japan and the Republic of Korea.  The Latin American and Caribbean countries as a group hold half the shares in the institution.

Opportunities for the Majority

March 24, 2008
This IDB initiative applies sustainable market-based strategies to bring the benefits of economic and social development to the majority of the population in Latin America and the Caribbean, reaching more than 360 million people—around 70 percent of the population—who live on less than US$300 per month. This low-income sector has not benefited substantially from the region’s recent economic growth, and meeting its needs requires new investment approaches from both the public and private sectors to make a positive impact from which all will benefit.

IDB and Infrastructure

March 24, 2008
    The Inter-American Development Bank, the main source of multilateral development financing for Latin America and the Caribbean, plans to allocate US$12 billion for infrastructure projects in the region by 2010.

The IDB in Brief

February 27, 2007
The Inter-American Development Bank was created in 1959 to help accelerate the economic and social development of its member countries in Latin America and the Caribbean and to promote regional integration. The Bank uses its own resources and those it raises on financial markets. In 1994 its authorized capital was increased by $40 billion to $101 billion.