A life beyond crime

August 27, 2012
A Jamaican citizen security program targets women involved in gangs For Pauline Crooks, quitting the Montego Bay gang that had helped her to put food on the table for six years wasn’t a quick or an easy decision. The single mother of three continued showing up at her “workplace”— where the gangsters ran lottery scams—even after she joined a parenting course offered by the Citizen Security and Justice Program (CSJP), an initiative launched in 2007 by Jamaica’s government to bring down crime in the island’s most violent communities.

Improving the business climate in the Caribbean

March 25, 2011
Several IDB programs are helping the region diversify its economy and attract new investments The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is financing several programs to improve the business environment, foster diversification and enhance competitiveness in the Caribbean.

Sustainable energy helps reduce costly reliance on fossil fuels in many Caribbean States

September 27, 2010
By Christina MacCulloch The international economic crisis, has hurt the Caribbean economies, mainly by affecting tourism. This has brought a sense of urgency to the region’s need to rely less on costly imported fossil fuels. The need for more energy efficiency is greater than ever, and so is the potential.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

September 27, 2010
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

Jamaica has a strong record of basic education improvement programs

September 27, 2010
By Omar Wahab Jamaica has a strong record of promoting primary education but the country’s education system still struggles to reach higher levels of literacy and numeracy across socio-economic groups.  

Beyond the soccer fields

July 05, 2010
What does the U.S. winning goal at the end of its match with Algeria in the World Cup have to do with youth employment in Latin America? Or what does the composure with which the English goalkeeper accepted a referee’s mistake that cost his team the victory have to do with the self-esteem of adolescents in Brazil? 

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

February 26, 2009
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

The underserved low-income market in the Caribbean

May 25, 2007
Close to 90 percent of the population in the Caribbean––over 11 million people, mostly in Haiti, Jamaica and Suriname—has an annual income lower than $3,260 or under $300 a month measured in purchasing-power-parity (PPP) dollars. This startling statistics comes from a new report presented at the seminar Opportunities for the Majority (OM) in the Caribbean, held by the IDB in Montego Bay, Jamaica, on May 17—18.

Trade in ethanol will benefit the U.S. and Latin America

February 07, 2007
By calling for the United States to use 35 billion gallons of renewable fuels by 2017, President Bush focused attention on a question that has been largely absent from the debate about ethanol, the most widely used biofuel. Namely, should the U.S. go it alone on ethanol?