Brazil’s Fisherwomen Mean Business

March 07, 2014
In Vila Castelo, a small town in the Brazilian state of Pará, fisherwomen are learning the ropes of fiscal management and entrepreneurship  Traditional fishing does not differ much today from what it has been since biblical times—a boat, a net, and a few men. Wait. Men? Maybe it has changed after all. At least in Vila Castelo, a tiny fishing village in Brazil’s state of Pará, women fish alongside men. 

Young people with big ideas that transform society

March 14, 2013
Participate and follow us on Twitter using @bidjuventud How does one solve old problems? With new ideas PANAMA CITY – We must listen to the voices of young people, with their fresh ideas and their plans for the future. And especially in Latin America and the Caribbean, the region with the world’s youngest population, where the average age is only 27.

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

May 30, 2012
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

IDB study examines potential for Brazil-Colombia integration

August 03, 2011
Beyond a boom that has pushed bilateral trade between Colombia and Brazil to $3 billion a year, both countries could tap enormous potential for growth if they addressed bottlenecks such as logistical costs and tariff barriers, according to a new study released by the Inter-American Development Bank’s Integration Department.

Innovative community participation supports program to fight environmental degradation of Brazil’s Atlantic forest

April 25, 2011
IDB helps promote conservation and provide better housing conditions for more than 8,000 families, many of them living in high-risk hillsides in Serra do Mar A $470 million project backed by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Brazilian state of Sao Paulo is seeking to protect what is left of the Atlantic forest while ensuring better livelihoods for the local communities. One of the key components of the project is to move residents to safer areas.

New future for children and youths in Ceará

April 25, 2011
Integrated actions involving families, schools, and communities assist children and youth at risk In an effort to reduce the poverty and neglect that afflict children and youth from poor households in the Brazilian state of Ceará, the state government is carrying out the Program to Support the Development of Children and Adolescents (PROARES), with financing from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

The IDB in Brazil at a glance

April 25, 2011
Highlights: support for the World Cup cities, environmental conservation, and infrastructure Brazil is one of the IDB’s founding member countries. Since 1961, the Bank has approved $40 billion in loans and guarantees for Brazil that have helped fund projects costing more than $110 billion. These projects, in the areas of ​​infrastructure, environment, institutional strengthening, and poverty reduction, have been carried out in close cooperation with all levels of government, civil society, and the private sector.

Mesoamerica renews push towards integration

October 25, 2010
The presidents of Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Colombia and the Dominican Republic will meet tomorrow, Oct. 26, in Cartagena, Colombia at the XII Summit of the Tuxtla Mechanism for Dialogue and Coordination. The heads of state will be informed of the progress made by the Mesoamerica Project in terms of regional integration and will decide further courses of action.

Central America's integration is in full swing

July 21, 2010
In late July, the first substation of the Central American Electrical Interconnection System (SIEPAC) is opening in Costa Rica. A week later, the substation in Panama will be ready to operate. Towers, lines and cables are already in place, so the southern section of the nascent Central American electricity market will soon be a reality. PAC53 - Road from La Chorrera to Arraijan, in Panama.