The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

February 26, 2009
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

A home-grown solution for Latin America’s water crisis

March 01, 2006
By Luis Alberto Moreno*As delegates gathered at the IV World Water Forum in Mexico City earlier this month, many were asking whether the private sector still has a role to play in solving the critical sanitation problems of the developing world.

Measuring the opposite of corruption

January 26, 2006
In many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, corruption is reluctantly accepted as part of the political workings of government, as an inevitable occurrence among those in power. However while everyone is well aware of its pervasiveness, the extent of corruption remains difficult to measure accurately, for it is hard to gauge what cannot be seen.

More growth or less inequality?

September 20, 2005
Increased investment, low inflation, an improved fiscal situation, decreased unemployment. Latin America and the Caribbean have been hearing plenty of good news the past 18 months. A group of renowned economists analyzed the situation at a seminar hosted by the IDB Research Department to honor IDB President Enrique V. Iglesias, who will retire on September 30. Iglesias himself opened the seminar, which was chaired by IDB Chief Economist Guillermo Calvo, with the participation of Ricardo Hausmann, Michael Mussa, José Antonio Ocampo and John Williamson.

Andean integration: Myths or realities?

September 12, 2005
While three of the five Andean countries—Colombia, Ecuador and Peru—are participating actively in the free trade agreement negotiations to promote commerce and investment between the United States and the Andean Community, the recent celebration of the Ninth Annual Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF) Conference served to reflect on the differences within the subregion and the positions held by the two other Andean countries, which abstained from taking part in the negotiations. Bolivia plays only the role of an observer, while Venezuela is skeptical of the proposed model.

The impact of the press on good governance

August 17, 2005
Unlike radio and television broadcasting or the Internet, the written press provides more detailed analysis of the news. It thus serves as a “ guide for citizens and authorities to attain good governance,” said the President of the Inter-American Press Association (IAPA), Alejandro Miró Quesada. Speaking at the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington, DC, the Peruvian journalist and lawyer discussed the relationship between journalism and governance in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Donors pledge support to assist Latin American countries in CAFTA-DR trade agreement to improve compliance of labor standards

July 20, 2005
Donors pledged their support to assist six Latin American countries participating in the CAFTA-DR free trade agreement with the United States in improving the compliance and enforcement of international and national labor standards and legislation. Delegations from Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua met with donors at the headquarters of the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, DC to discuss their strategic priorities and specific goals they want to accomplish regarding labor law compliance and institutional strengthening.

When good intentions bring bad results

March 18, 2005
Many subsidies aimed at helping the underprivileged benefit the rich instead of the poor, according to professor Ramon Lopez from the University of Maryland's Agricultural and Resource Economics Department. And he has 15 years of empirical data in 10 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean to prove it. According to his study, presented at IDB headquarters, some 45 percent of rural public expenditure in the region between 1985 and 2000 was spent on non-social subsidies, imposing a dramatic cost in efficiency, social equity and environmental decay in rural areas.

A New Government for the XXI Century

March 10, 2005
These past ten years have seen many changes in the national and international level, a great improvement in women health, education, professional and intellectual development, citizen rights, and even women have won more positions in the government, allowing women such as Epsy Campbell to serve directly and with more influence to her fellow Costa Ricans. However, she recognizes that for her, as well as for many other women, enjoying those rights was not easy because in the personal level many times these changes can not be seen.