Mesoamerica renews push towards integration

October 25, 2010
The presidents of Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Colombia and the Dominican Republic will meet tomorrow, Oct. 26, in Cartagena, Colombia at the XII Summit of the Tuxtla Mechanism for Dialogue and Coordination. The heads of state will be informed of the progress made by the Mesoamerica Project in terms of regional integration and will decide further courses of action.

Central America's integration is in full swing

July 21, 2010
In late July, the first substation of the Central American Electrical Interconnection System (SIEPAC) is opening in Costa Rica. A week later, the substation in Panama will be ready to operate. Towers, lines and cables are already in place, so the southern section of the nascent Central American electricity market will soon be a reality. PAC53 - Road from La Chorrera to Arraijan, in Panama.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Acting smart when income grows

March 27, 2008
The expansive economic cycle in Latin America rests largely on the rise of key commodity prices, but experience suggests caution in thriving years.

The Big Bad Wolf?

December 20, 2007
By Diego Fonseca   While Central America is nervous about CAFTA, the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) has rattled countries with large economies, such as Brazil and Argentina. And although the most recent negotiations, in late 2003 and early 2004, didn’t produce agreement on major issues such as agricultural subsidies, government procurement and intellectual property rights, January 1, 2005, continues to be the apparent date for the birth of the FTAA, which may, like beer, come in a robust version or a “lite” version.

A home-grown solution for Latin America’s water crisis

March 01, 2006
By Luis Alberto Moreno*As delegates gathered at the IV World Water Forum in Mexico City earlier this month, many were asking whether the private sector still has a role to play in solving the critical sanitation problems of the developing world.

Andean integration: Myths or realities?

September 12, 2005
While three of the five Andean countries—Colombia, Ecuador and Peru—are participating actively in the free trade agreement negotiations to promote commerce and investment between the United States and the Andean Community, the recent celebration of the Ninth Annual Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF) Conference served to reflect on the differences within the subregion and the positions held by the two other Andean countries, which abstained from taking part in the negotiations. Bolivia plays only the role of an observer, while Venezuela is skeptical of the proposed model.

Donors pledge support to assist Latin American countries in CAFTA-DR trade agreement to improve compliance of labor standards

July 20, 2005
Donors pledged their support to assist six Latin American countries participating in the CAFTA-DR free trade agreement with the United States in improving the compliance and enforcement of international and national labor standards and legislation. Delegations from Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua met with donors at the headquarters of the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, DC to discuss their strategic priorities and specific goals they want to accomplish regarding labor law compliance and institutional strengthening.

Environmental action as a source of revenue

February 18, 2005
The 1997 Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which takes effect on Feb. 16, brings Latin America and the Caribbean an opportunity to link sustainable economic development with environmental protection. Under the Kyoto Protocol, roughly 30 of the world’s industrialized nations have agreed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions below 1990 levels by the year 2012.

Increasing tax collection

January 10, 2005
If Central America wants to improve social equity and achieve fast and continuous economic growth, its countries need to increase tax collection and modernize their tax systems, according to a recent study by IDB economists Manuel R. Agosin and Roberto Machado entitled Tax Reform and Human Development in Central America. Regional tax reform is necessary because “Central American states are too small and vulnerable to provide essential public goods for the economic growth and the people’s well being.”