Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Women entrepreneurs: too often trapped in the microenterprise ghetto

October 05, 2011
Innovative approaches can boost women’s economic presence among small business owners in Latin America and the Caribbean Over the past three decades, women in Latin America and the Caribbean have dramatically increased their role in the workforce. Currently, about half of women in the region are economically active, more than double the level in the 1970s. They have been elected presidents of several Latin American countries and often dominate the microenterprise and microfinance sector, providing an important contribution to regional economies.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Women on the challenges of being a scientist in Latin America and the Caribbean

January 16, 2007
Regardless of whether you’re a woman or a man, it’s not easy being a scientist in Latin America or the Caribbean (LAC).  Like anywhere else in the world, from the time one starts university it takes ten years of research and hard work just to earn a PhD in LAC, followed by several years working in postdoctoral fellowship positions.

Youth get training to change course of life

December 12, 2006
Jose Luis Pereira, 26 years old, is the older of six siblings who live in Carabayllo, a suburb of recent expansion and one of the poorest districts of the Peruvian capital. About 150,000 people live there in poverty amidst a lack good employment opportunities.

Leveling the retirement age for men and women

November 20, 2006
Latin American and Caribbean women could probably get a 30% higher payout if their retirement age were changed to equal men’s retirement age, noted specialist Truman Packard of the World Bank during a recent presentation at IDB headquarters. His new analysis sheds a bit more light on the differences between men’s and women’s participation in Latin American pension systems.

Goodbye to rural poverty

March 20, 2006
Agriculture alone can't put an end to rural poverty. That is one of the conclusions of the studies directed by Hans Cansen, researcher and Central American coordinator, and Shenggen Fan, director of government and development strategies at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Hans Cansen centered his study on three Central American countries: Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. His goal was to describe the assets of rural populations in order to understand their impact on economic growth and living standards and propose strategies for rural investment.

A home-grown solution for Latin America’s water crisis

March 01, 2006
By Luis Alberto Moreno*As delegates gathered at the IV World Water Forum in Mexico City earlier this month, many were asking whether the private sector still has a role to play in solving the critical sanitation problems of the developing world.

Filling the IT skills gap with Latin American youth

December 16, 2005
When visiting any Latin American city, it is hard to ignore the people selling t-shirts, toys, food and anything else imaginable in sidewalk markets, on street corners and the sides of highways. This type of livelihood in the informal sector has become a reality for millions of people in the region, a reflection of the lack of quality jobs and high levels of unemployment plaguing the region. What then are the prospects for disadvantaged young people attempting to enter the job market?

Donors pledge support to assist Latin American countries in CAFTA-DR trade agreement to improve compliance of labor standards

July 20, 2005
Donors pledged their support to assist six Latin American countries participating in the CAFTA-DR free trade agreement with the United States in improving the compliance and enforcement of international and national labor standards and legislation. Delegations from Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua met with donors at the headquarters of the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, DC to discuss their strategic priorities and specific goals they want to accomplish regarding labor law compliance and institutional strengthening.