Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Guyana: A healthy future, one sprinkle at a time

September 27, 2010
By Leticia Ramjag and Joylin Greaves Bibi Ramcharran registered at the Herstelling Health Centre when she learnt she was pregnant. She then continued to visit the clinic with her daughter, Aneisa, who is now a healthy 14-month old girl.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

September 27, 2010
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

Central America's integration is in full swing

July 21, 2010
In late July, the first substation of the Central American Electrical Interconnection System (SIEPAC) is opening in Costa Rica. A week later, the substation in Panama will be ready to operate. Towers, lines and cables are already in place, so the southern section of the nascent Central American electricity market will soon be a reality. PAC53 - Road from La Chorrera to Arraijan, in Panama.

Mesoamerica Advances

July 29, 2009
The regional integration initiative known as Proyecto Mesoamérica is gaining momentum. It was a central item on the agenda of the XI Cumbre de Tuxla (an annual summit of regional heads of state), which concluded in Costa Rica today. Last week news reports focused on a proposed multimodal transportation strategy to improve the region’s competitiveness. And last June, the IDB announced the second phase of a project known as Tránsito Internacional de Mercancía, which will introduce a unified customs system for use on the borders of all Mesoamerican countries.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Argentine laboratory tracks a killer

October 01, 2006
An inch-long bug is laid out on Mariano Levin’s desk at the Institute for Research in Genetic Engineering and Molecular Biology (INGEBI) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Called the vinchuca , “kissing bug” or “assassin bug,” Triatoma infestans is a forest-dwelling insect that invades thatched roofs and cracks in mud walls of poor rural homes in northern Argentina and other parts of Latin America. It drops down on its victims, often at night, and infects them with a parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, that causes Chagas disease, a potentially crippling and sometimes deadly affliction.

A home-grown solution for Latin America’s water crisis

March 01, 2006
By Luis Alberto Moreno*As delegates gathered at the IV World Water Forum in Mexico City earlier this month, many were asking whether the private sector still has a role to play in solving the critical sanitation problems of the developing world.

Cash transfers: hand-outs or a hand up?

September 27, 2005
There's an old Chinese proverb that says, “Give a man a fish and you feed him for today. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” While that may be smart advice, doing both things together can be even more effective when it comes to reducing poverty.

Racial and ethnic disparities in health in Latin America

May 03, 2005
Are Afro-descendants and indigenous peoples in better or worse health than Latin Americans of European descent? Four new studies on race, ethnicity and health in Latin America produced some unexpected and sometimes contradictory results. In poor rural villages in Mexico, for instance, indigenous groups report being in better health than non-indigenous groups, said Ashu Handa, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He took data from the PROGRESA cash transfer program for the poor and compared it with the National Health Survey findings.