Young people with big ideas that transform society

March 14, 2013
Participate and follow us on Twitter using @bidjuventud How does one solve old problems? With new ideas PANAMA CITY – We must listen to the voices of young people, with their fresh ideas and their plans for the future. And especially in Latin America and the Caribbean, the region with the world’s youngest population, where the average age is only 27.

Fact Sheet: IDB and Youth Employment

December 20, 2011
Challenges of youth unemployment and underemployment Despite the relatively high economic growth Latin America and the Caribbean has experienced over the past few years, a significant portion of its population remains in poverty, including a large percentage of youth.

Improving science and math learning in Argentina

March 23, 2011
IDB-based pilot project sheds light on new teaching approaches to improve learning in poor areas Since Latin America consistently underperforms in international student assessments, governments in the region are looking for pedagogical models to help improve student learning. The region’s students still perform below students in rich nations and East Asian countries, particularly in the areas of mathematics and natural science.

Learning through Play

November 10, 2010
It were the results of international tests that raised the red flag: students in Latin America ranked among the lowest performing in the world on standardized tests in Math and the Natural Sciences. In Argentina, the government decided to prioritize both of these subjects in its education policy.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

September 27, 2010
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

The Mayan world in the digital era

February 09, 2007
The past and future of Guatemala merge in the new IDB Cultural Center art exhibition, honoring the host country of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors of the Inter-American Development Bank. Unlike previous art exhibitions at the Cultural Center, the exhibition “Guatemala: Past and Future” is made up of multimedia presentations that portray key elements of Mayan culture in digitally restored versions.

Women on the challenges of being a scientist in Latin America and the Caribbean

January 16, 2007
Regardless of whether you’re a woman or a man, it’s not easy being a scientist in Latin America or the Caribbean (LAC).  Like anywhere else in the world, from the time one starts university it takes ten years of research and hard work just to earn a PhD in LAC, followed by several years working in postdoctoral fellowship positions.

Improving avenues towards post-secondary and higher education for indigenous people

April 12, 2006
Considering the sheer diversity of indigenous peoples and languages in Ecuador, Colombia, Guatemala and Nicaragua, with 22 different languages spoken among the majority (60 percent) Mayan population in Guatemala alone, it seems logical that terms like multiethnic, multilingual and culturally pluralistic would be used to describe their national compositions.

Goodbye to rural poverty

March 20, 2006
Agriculture alone can't put an end to rural poverty. That is one of the conclusions of the studies directed by Hans Cansen, researcher and Central American coordinator, and Shenggen Fan, director of government and development strategies at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Hans Cansen centered his study on three Central American countries: Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. His goal was to describe the assets of rural populations in order to understand their impact on economic growth and living standards and propose strategies for rural investment.