Innovation is the key to sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean

November 08, 2010
The countries of Latin America and the Caribbean are making comparatively low investments in research and development, and the region’s private sector is also comparatively under-represented in R&D spending, according to a new study by the Inter-American Development Bank. Through a comparative analysis of R&D investments in developed countries, the study, entitled “The need to innovate,” concludes that companies in Latin America and the Caribbean have favored technology procurement strategies instead of promote endogenous generation of technology and new ideas.

Sustainable energy for Haiti, Bahamas and Barbados

May 21, 2010
Tens of thousands of Haitians who lost their homes in Port-au-Prince have left the city and migrated to rural villages or temporary encampments. International aid organizations are currently helping to construct clinics, schools, administrative centers and warehouses in some of these villages, which are located in remote areas without access to basic services.

When water and climate converge

March 20, 2010
In Latin America, water is more tightly linked to human potential and economic competitiveness than in any other part of the world. The region has roughly 31 percent of the planet´s freshwater resources, while holding only 8 percent of its population. This huge water advantage enables Latin America to get a 68 percent of all its electricity from hydroelectric sources, compared to a global average of less than 16 percent.

Life in an uncertain climate

December 07, 2009
Climate change has the potential to undermine many of the advances in social and economic development that Latin American and Caribbean countries have made in recent decades. With support from the IDB, the region’s governments are designing strategies for adapting to different climate change scenarios, applying new technologies to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), and redoubling efforts to achieve sustainable development. Threats to the region

What is needed to ensure universal access to water and sanitation services in Latin America?

October 30, 2009
At the IDB, we believe there are four main challenges: attracting new investment; ensuring the quality, quantity and reliability of water resources; strengthening the institutions responsible for planning, regulation and monitoring; and improving the efficiency of operators of these services. To help countries in the region achieve universal access to sustainable, reliable, reasonable quality  services, in 2007 the Bank launched the Water and Sanitation Initiative.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Inter-American Development Bank named Best Multilateral by LatinFinance

November 07, 2008
LatinFinance, the leading source of financial market intelligence for the Latin American and the Caribbean, named the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) as the best multilateral institution this year. LatinFinance praised the bank’s efforts to finance the largest ongoing infra-structure projects in the region, highlighting the bank’s innovative lending instruments.

A chance to close the water and sanitation gap

October 31, 2008
As any marathon runner will tell you, the last mile can be the hardest to complete. Water and sanitation specialists have their own definition of the “last mile.”  For them it means the final segment of water and sewer networks—the thin pipes that connect individual homes to water mains and drainage pipes buried under streets.

“Greening” at IDB headquarters and country offices

April 28, 2006
You can learn a lot from the back of a Starbuck’s napkin. Above the friendly recycling arrows, it relays that the product is made from 100 percent recycled fibers, at least 40 percent post-consumer material and that no bleach was used in its production, a mini advertisement for the company’s environmental savviness. This informal way to disclose corporate sustainable practices to coffee drinkers worldwide is reflective of the trail blazed by private companies over the past decade in issuing reports on corporate social responsibility.

Water Works

March 17, 2006
By LUIS ALBERTO MORENO   When delegates gather at the 4th World Water Forum in Mexico City, many will be asking whether the private sector still has a role to play in solving the critical sanitation and potable water problems of the developing world.