Young people with big ideas that transform society

March 14, 2013
Participate and follow us on Twitter using @bidjuventud How does one solve old problems? With new ideas PANAMA CITY – We must listen to the voices of young people, with their fresh ideas and their plans for the future. And especially in Latin America and the Caribbean, the region with the world’s youngest population, where the average age is only 27.

Mayas, the flight through time

December 19, 2012
A new documentary shows how a 3,500-year-old culture remains vibrant in Mesoamerica When the Mayan people abandoned their cities of gleaming limestone in the 9th century AD, they took with them something far more enduring than monuments: They took their culture.  Over the centuries, as the forest reclaimed these vast temple complexes, the descendents of this great civilization continued to speak their ancestral languages, find meaning in the same cosmology, and even eat the same foods. 

Paraguay and the IDB: partners in development

December 15, 2011
Paraguay is a founding member of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Bank’s partner in development Through an ongoing process of cooperation, financing has been provided to the Paraguay to carry out major works, which have spurred the country’s economy. This year, the Bank’s portfolio of projects in execution in Paraguay totals 27 sovereign guarantee operations for $755.27 million, of which $445.9 million are pending disbursement.

Canada and the IDB: Partners for Prosperity

March 04, 2011
For almost four decades, Canada has been a strong and reliable partner of the Inter-American Development Bank. It joined the IDB, the world’s oldest and largest regional development bank, in 1972, several years before it became a member of the Organization of American States.

Mesoamerica renews push towards integration

October 25, 2010
The presidents of Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Colombia and the Dominican Republic will meet tomorrow, Oct. 26, in Cartagena, Colombia at the XII Summit of the Tuxtla Mechanism for Dialogue and Coordination. The heads of state will be informed of the progress made by the Mesoamerica Project in terms of regional integration and will decide further courses of action.

Central America's integration is in full swing

July 21, 2010
In late July, the first substation of the Central American Electrical Interconnection System (SIEPAC) is opening in Costa Rica. A week later, the substation in Panama will be ready to operate. Towers, lines and cables are already in place, so the southern section of the nascent Central American electricity market will soon be a reality. PAC53 - Road from La Chorrera to Arraijan, in Panama.

Mesoamerica Advances

July 29, 2009
The regional integration initiative known as Proyecto Mesoamérica is gaining momentum. It was a central item on the agenda of the XI Cumbre de Tuxla (an annual summit of regional heads of state), which concluded in Costa Rica today. Last week news reports focused on a proposed multimodal transportation strategy to improve the region’s competitiveness. And last June, the IDB announced the second phase of a project known as Tránsito Internacional de Mercancía, which will introduce a unified customs system for use on the borders of all Mesoamerican countries.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Virtuous lobbyists

November 01, 2007
Originally designed as a train station and built in 1930 by German engineers in Guatemala’s northwestern department of Quetzaltenango, the structure was converted into an army base following the demise of the railroad a few years later. It remained an army facility for decades, until cutbacks in military spending after the 1996 Peace Accord. Then the government decided to close the base, leaving its future in doubt. Some police officials thought the building would be ideal for a new headquarters. Civic leaders argued on behalf of making it a cultural center.

A biodiesel odyssey

August 01, 2007
Some people travel in order to find themselves. Others travel to find sources of clean, renewable fuels. Last April, exactly 50 years after Jack Kerouac published “On the road,” one of the defining novels of the Beat Generation, a group of young professionals gathered in Washington, D.C., to embark on a very different kind of road trip.