Maximum Return on Public Investments in Suriname

April 01, 2013
Managing public investment is one of the most challenging jobs for governments, particularly in the developing world. For public investment to effectively generate development, countries must have the technical and institutional capacity to ensure that the projects selected have the highest economic and social rate of return.

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

IDB expects to provide more than $500 million to help Latin America and Caribbean prepare for natural disasters

March 10, 2011
Financial disaster preparedness is a growing concern in Latin America and the Caribbean. Last year the region saw devastating earthquakes in Chile and Haiti and an active hurricane season that impacted Central America and Mexico. In addition, the La Niña-related weather phenomenon has brought severe flooding to Venezuela, Colombia and Brazil, among others.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

September 27, 2010
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

Latin America and the Caribbean see slower growth in next four years

March 19, 2009
Latin American and Caribbean leaders expect per capita income to fall or grow moderately in the 2009–2012  period and governments to rely more on financing from international institutions, according to a survey by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The expectations contrast sharply with the recent economic performance in the region, where product per capita grew 4.1 percent annually in the past five years.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Microfinance Ranking Championship League 2008

October 08, 2008
By Matthew Gerhrke, Renso Martinez and Maria Cecilia Rondon, Microfinance Information Exchange, INC. (MIX)Microfinance in Latin America and the Caribbean skyrocketed in 2007, fueled by booming demand for financial services from microentrepreneurs in the region’s fastgrowing economies along with new funding in both debt and deposit. The region and its microfinance institutions (MFIs) remained in the forefront of attractive investment opportunities.

IDB and Energy

March 27, 2008
The Inter-American Development Bank’s energy portfolio includes a wide array of investments aimed at improving the energy security of its member countries by exploiting both conventional and renewable sources. In 2007 the Bank approved US$2.5 billion in energy-related operations. Many of these loans will support high-priority gas and electricity infrastructure projects. For example, the IDB approved: A US$32.7 million loan for a wide-ranging investment program to strengthen Nicaragua’s electricity system.

IDB in Brief

March 24, 2008
The Inter-American Development Bank was created in 1959 to help accelerate the economic and social development of its member countries in Latin America and the Caribbean and to promote regional integration. The Bank has 47 member countries: 28 in the Western Hemisphere, 16 in Europe, as well as Israel, Japan and the Republic of Korea.  The Latin American and Caribbean countries as a group hold half the shares in the institution.

Opportunities for the Majority

March 24, 2008
This IDB initiative applies sustainable market-based strategies to bring the benefits of economic and social development to the majority of the population in Latin America and the Caribbean, reaching more than 360 million people—around 70 percent of the population—who live on less than US$300 per month. This low-income sector has not benefited substantially from the region’s recent economic growth, and meeting its needs requires new investment approaches from both the public and private sectors to make a positive impact from which all will benefit.