Inter-American Development Bank to hold Annual Meeting in Nassau, The Bahamas

February 11, 2016
Online media registration is now available for April 7–10 gathering of Latin American and Caribbean leaders Spotlight on economic challenges, private sector opportunities, urban development, global economic challenges, disaster management The Inter-American Development Bank Group will hold its Annual Meeti

IDB President Luis Alberto Moreno and PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi to Unveil Groundbreaking Nutrition Project

October 06, 2014
On eve of World Food Day, IDB-PepsiCo Foundation will Launch Program in Four Countries Inter-American Development Bank President Luis Alberto Moreno and PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi will host a media breakfast on Wednesday, October 15th in Washington, D.C. to announce a major partnership on a ground-breaking nutrition project in four countries: Colombia, Guatemala, Mexico, and Peru.

Hungry Planet: What the World Eats

April 24, 2014
The exhibition includes photographs of 30 families in 24 countries, to understand humankind’s oldest social activity: eating "Hungry Planet", a photographic exhibition by the photojournalits Peter Menzel and the writer Faith D'Aluisio, presented by the Infrastructure and Environment Sector of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is a visual walk-through portraying eating habits of different families around the world.

Five states and provinces from Latin America to receive IDB prize for innovative government practices

January 14, 2014
The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) will on Jan. 15 award the GobernArte Prize for the most innovative government programs to five states and provinces from Latin America, in the smart government and the citizen security categories. The winners will receive the prize from IDB President Luis Alberto Moreno at a special event in the Bank’s headquarters in Washington, DC. The winners are:

Mexico’s Salud Digna: Preventive Care at Affordable Prices

April 08, 2013
One of the biggest challenges for public health systems in Latin America and the Caribbean is the rise of chronic and non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and cancer. Overwhelmed by growing demand, public primary care units and hospitals are unable to provide timely diagnostic services such as blood tests and mammograms that would allow low-income patients to identify and treat their conditions.

Cost-Effective Investment in Neglected Tropical Diseases in Mexico

March 04, 2013
At the end of 2011, Maria Rodriguez, who lives in the mountains in Huixtán in Chiapas, Mexico, started having such serious problems with her eyes that she could barely do her daily chores such as cooking and preparing her children for school.

Joint communiqué from the Government of Jamaica and IDB

January 18, 2013
During the Second Annual Meeting of the Caribbean Governors of the Inter-American Development Bank, IDB President Luis Alberto Moreno met in Kingston today with the Rt. Hon. Prime Minister of Jamaica Portia Simpson Miller and Finance Minister Dr. The Hon. Peter Phillips to discuss strategies to advance Jamaica’s economic and social agenda.

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Winners from Mexico, Peru, Bolivia and Colombia of the IDB Call for Proposals for new financial instruments for the agricultural sector

September 18, 2012
The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Spanish Trust Fund announced that institutions in Mexico, Chile, Colombia and Bolivia were the winners of the third call for proposals of the Better Conditions for Productivity (MAP) on the topic of new financial instruments for the agricultural sector in Latin America and the Caribbean.

A life beyond crime

August 27, 2012
A Jamaican citizen security program targets women involved in gangs For Pauline Crooks, quitting the Montego Bay gang that had helped her to put food on the table for six years wasn’t a quick or an easy decision. The single mother of three continued showing up at her “workplace”— where the gangsters ran lottery scams—even after she joined a parenting course offered by the Citizen Security and Justice Program (CSJP), an initiative launched in 2007 by Jamaica’s government to bring down crime in the island’s most violent communities.