IDB seminars in Medellín to discuss impacts of global financial crisis

March 23, 2009
The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is promoting the discussion and analysis of the impacts of the global financial crisis in Latin America and the Caribbean during seminars in Medellín, Colombia, related to the 50th Annual Meeting of the Bank'sBoard of Governors. The discussions will feature government leaders such as Colombian President Alvaro Uribe, Zhou Xiaochuan and governor of the People’s Bank of China, as well as noted experts such as Robert Merton, a Nobel Prize-winner economist.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Technology is the easy part of mobile banking

October 08, 2008
BY DIEGO FONSECA

Sharing information is power

February 02, 2007
Sharing information is key for development, said Google’s Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist, Vinton G. Cerf. Speaking at a Forum of the Americas meeting at Bank headquarters in Washington, D.C., the architect of the Internet shared his vision for bringing innovation to development. Cerf, co-designer of the Internet's communications protocols, shared his vision for bringing innovation to developmentT.

Mexico – EU Free Trade Area opens doors to foreign trade for Latin America

July 30, 2004
The Mexico-European Union Free Trade Agreement, the first such accord between Europe and a country in the Americas, is celebrating its fourth anniversary and 27% growth in bilateral trade volume. (1) However, long-term benefits are not easily measured. The reported effective growth rates - 19% for Mexican exports to the European Union, and 30% for EU exports to Mexico – is considered relatively low compared with Mexico’s 18% increase in exports worldwide.