Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Central America's integration is in full swing

July 21, 2010
In late July, the first substation of the Central American Electrical Interconnection System (SIEPAC) is opening in Costa Rica. A week later, the substation in Panama will be ready to operate. Towers, lines and cables are already in place, so the southern section of the nascent Central American electricity market will soon be a reality. PAC53 - Road from La Chorrera to Arraijan, in Panama.

Mesoamerica Advances

July 29, 2009
The regional integration initiative known as Proyecto Mesoamérica is gaining momentum. It was a central item on the agenda of the XI Cumbre de Tuxla (an annual summit of regional heads of state), which concluded in Costa Rica today. Last week news reports focused on a proposed multimodal transportation strategy to improve the region’s competitiveness. And last June, the IDB announced the second phase of a project known as Tránsito Internacional de Mercancía, which will introduce a unified customs system for use on the borders of all Mesoamerican countries.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Reaching the neediest with health care

August 01, 2007
Jacobo Vicente Méndez, a 54-year-old farm worker, heard from a passing car with a loudspeaker that a nurse would make a monthly visit to his small mountain community of La Unión, in Guatemala's western department of Quetzaltenango. The population of 1,700 subsists by growing basic food crops, such as beans and corn, at an altitude of 2,100 meters above sea level.

Eating disorders as a public health emergency

August 28, 2006
People tend to think of eating disorders as problems of the middle and upper classes, but it is a pervasive issue among low-income women as well, said professor of sociology at the London School of Economics, Dr. Susie Orbach, during a seminar on eating problems and mental health held at IDB headquarters. “Only two percent of women worldwide feel able to call themselves beautiful,” said Dr. Orbach, declaring the eating disorders problems as a world-wide public health emergency.

Racial and ethnic disparities in health in Latin America

May 03, 2005
Are Afro-descendants and indigenous peoples in better or worse health than Latin Americans of European descent? Four new studies on race, ethnicity and health in Latin America produced some unexpected and sometimes contradictory results. In poor rural villages in Mexico, for instance, indigenous groups report being in better health than non-indigenous groups, said Ashu Handa, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He took data from the PROGRESA cash transfer program for the poor and compared it with the National Health Survey findings.

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

April 21, 2005
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”