How Land Titling Can Boost Access to Credit for Farmers in Ecuador

March 27, 2013
For more than 70 years, the Herrera family has owned and farmed 300 hectares in the municipality of Pimampiro in northern Ecuador. The family had a deed for the land but it provided few details about the exact property lines, which areas had been set aside as protected areas, and in which parts farming was allowed.

High taxes and evasion eroding economic growth in Latin America and the Caribbean

March 04, 2010
Complex tax systems and widespread evasion are distorting investment decisions by companies in Latin America and the Caribbean, reducing the efficiency of markets and preventing governments from investing in infrastructure, education and other key public goods. This hinders the productive possibilities of the region’s economies, according to a newly released study by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

IDB seminars in Medellín to discuss impacts of global financial crisis

March 23, 2009
The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is promoting the discussion and analysis of the impacts of the global financial crisis in Latin America and the Caribbean during seminars in Medellín, Colombia, related to the 50th Annual Meeting of the Bank'sBoard of Governors. The discussions will feature government leaders such as Colombian President Alvaro Uribe, Zhou Xiaochuan and governor of the People’s Bank of China, as well as noted experts such as Robert Merton, a Nobel Prize-winner economist.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

February 26, 2009
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

A new way to pave city streets

February 26, 2009
Throughout Latin America low-income neighborhoods have difficulty in paving city streets. Municipalities are typically short of funds, and many informal urban settlements have not yet been properly incorporated into the tax base. An innovative solution has been devised by CEMEX, a multinational cement company based in Mexico, to mobilize both public and private resources to pave streets in low-income neighborhoods.

Expansionary Policies to Fight the Crisis Work, but not for all Countries

February 25, 2009
The financial crisis has brought Keynesianism back to the center stage of the policy debate worldwide. Several Latin American and Caribbean nations are announcing their own fiscal stimulus packages to try to weather the latest global credit crunch. A new study by the Inter-American Development Bank shows that recessions are far less severe in countries with room to adopt more flexible monetary and fiscal policies. However, this is not something for all nations, as success depends on economic initial conditions at the time of the crisis.

The growing role of Latin American currencies

June 23, 2008
When the sovereign debts of both Brazil and Peru were upgraded to investment levels by international rating agencies in the first quarter of 2008, the two nations joined an exclusive club of financial winners whose other two Latin American members were Mexico and Chile. Mexico’s debt became investment grade in 2000, while Chile’s achieved that status in 1992.

Pooling resources through Hometown Associations

May 31, 2006
Some say that the origins of Chicago’s Mexican community can be traced down to the city block, with Michoacanos living on one and Zacatecanos on another nearby. Whether this is an accurate depiction of Mexican migrant settlement patterns or not, the idea of maintaining a strong connection with one’s roots is an important part of the lives of many migrants, and is also the driving force behind the formation of transnational migrant organizations, or Hometown Associations (HTAs).

Latin America moves ahead despite external threats

October 31, 2005
Many fear the possibility of interest rate hikes and a global recession if the “Chinese addiction” to buying dollars comes to an end, expressed the IDB Chief Economist, Guillermo Calvo. But the seven largest economies in Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela, also known as the LAC-7) are currently growing fast. Stock prices went up 174% in the past two years, bank credit and foreign investment are increasing, and commodity prices have also enjoyed a boost.