Brazil’s Fisherwomen Mean Business

March 07, 2014
In Vila Castelo, a small town in the Brazilian state of Pará, fisherwomen are learning the ropes of fiscal management and entrepreneurship  Traditional fishing does not differ much today from what it has been since biblical times—a boat, a net, and a few men. Wait. Men? Maybe it has changed after all. At least in Vila Castelo, a tiny fishing village in Brazil’s state of Pará, women fish alongside men. 

Young people with big ideas that transform society

March 14, 2013
Participate and follow us on Twitter using @bidjuventud How does one solve old problems? With new ideas PANAMA CITY – We must listen to the voices of young people, with their fresh ideas and their plans for the future. And especially in Latin America and the Caribbean, the region with the world’s youngest population, where the average age is only 27.

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

May 30, 2012
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

Tourism on the rise

November 01, 2011
Since 1994, the IDB has contributed to the creation of more than one million jobs by providing support during the different stages of the Tourism Development Program (PRODETUR) The Inter-American Development Bank has made important contributions to the development of Brazil’s tourism industry since 2004 with its support for the Northeast Tourism Development Program (PRODETUR Nordeste I).

Innovative community participation supports program to fight environmental degradation of Brazil’s Atlantic forest

April 25, 2011
IDB helps promote conservation and provide better housing conditions for more than 8,000 families, many of them living in high-risk hillsides in Serra do Mar A $470 million project backed by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Brazilian state of Sao Paulo is seeking to protect what is left of the Atlantic forest while ensuring better livelihoods for the local communities. One of the key components of the project is to move residents to safer areas.

Improving science and math learning in Argentina

March 23, 2011
IDB-based pilot project sheds light on new teaching approaches to improve learning in poor areas Since Latin America consistently underperforms in international student assessments, governments in the region are looking for pedagogical models to help improve student learning. The region’s students still perform below students in rich nations and East Asian countries, particularly in the areas of mathematics and natural science.

IDB expects to provide more than $500 million to help Latin America and Caribbean prepare for natural disasters

March 10, 2011
Financial disaster preparedness is a growing concern in Latin America and the Caribbean. Last year the region saw devastating earthquakes in Chile and Haiti and an active hurricane season that impacted Central America and Mexico. In addition, the La Niña-related weather phenomenon has brought severe flooding to Venezuela, Colombia and Brazil, among others.

Learning through Play

November 10, 2010
It were the results of international tests that raised the red flag: students in Latin America ranked among the lowest performing in the world on standardized tests in Math and the Natural Sciences. In Argentina, the government decided to prioritize both of these subjects in its education policy.

Happiness and violence in Argentina: crime victims tend to favor more lenient measures

February 15, 2010
Are you happy? Did you smile yesterday? Increasingly economists are putting emotional questions like these at the heart of their studies in an attempt to uncover the links between happiness, human behavior, beliefs and policies.  Though crime has received relatively little attention in happiness research, a new study by the Inter-American Development Bank provides surprising insights: Victims of crime are no less happy than others.