Mayas, the flight through time

December 19, 2012
A new documentary shows how a 3,500-year-old culture remains vibrant in Mesoamerica When the Mayan people abandoned their cities of gleaming limestone in the 9th century AD, they took with them something far more enduring than monuments: They took their culture.  Over the centuries, as the forest reclaimed these vast temple complexes, the descendents of this great civilization continued to speak their ancestral languages, find meaning in the same cosmology, and even eat the same foods. 

IDB expects to provide more than $500 million to help Latin America and Caribbean prepare for natural disasters

March 10, 2011
Financial disaster preparedness is a growing concern in Latin America and the Caribbean. Last year the region saw devastating earthquakes in Chile and Haiti and an active hurricane season that impacted Central America and Mexico. In addition, the La Niña-related weather phenomenon has brought severe flooding to Venezuela, Colombia and Brazil, among others.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

September 27, 2010
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

Latin America and the Caribbean see slower growth in next four years

March 19, 2009
Latin American and Caribbean leaders expect per capita income to fall or grow moderately in the 2009–2012  period and governments to rely more on financing from international institutions, according to a survey by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The expectations contrast sharply with the recent economic performance in the region, where product per capita grew 4.1 percent annually in the past five years.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

The Arts of the Caribbean

August 24, 2007
A selection of 39 artworks by recognized Caribbean artists will be on display in a new art exhibit at the IDB. This vibrant exhibit coming from a collection of two thousand works, of the Organization of American States (OAS) Art Museum of the Americas, features paintings, sculptures, drawings, engravings and photographs by masters such as Amelia Peláez, Juan José Sicre and Mario Carreño. The selection centers on countries that represent the Spanish, English, French and Dutch speaking Caribbean, offering a broad perspective of the region.

Latinos from the Far East

March 01, 2006
By Charo QuesadaWhen Mexicans or Panamanians say they are “going to the Chino for groceries” they are not talking about some Chinese individual that happened to open a business around the corner from where they live. In their countries, the Chinese store has become an institution with a long tradition, providing a large and convenient selection of basic products, at low cost and with convenient business hours.

More growth or less inequality?

September 20, 2005
Increased investment, low inflation, an improved fiscal situation, decreased unemployment. Latin America and the Caribbean have been hearing plenty of good news the past 18 months. A group of renowned economists analyzed the situation at a seminar hosted by the IDB Research Department to honor IDB President Enrique V. Iglesias, who will retire on September 30. Iglesias himself opened the seminar, which was chaired by IDB Chief Economist Guillermo Calvo, with the participation of Ricardo Hausmann, Michael Mussa, José Antonio Ocampo and John Williamson.

The winning card

September 06, 2005
Remittances and a cross-border network of businesses, nonprofits, credit unions, microfinance institutions and other financial players are connected through a debit and stored-value card platform that has one very simple result: everybody wins. The business model, combining efficient use of technology with cheaper remittances transactions and better business for financial institutions, was presented at IDB headquarters by UCLA professor and successful entrepreneur Raúl Hinojosa.

Latin American art with Japanese roots

February 01, 2005
By Roger HamiltonThe Japanese immigrants who swept into Latin America at the turn of the 20th century were no different than those of other origins. Poor, out of opportunities and often out of luck, they saw the Americas as a land of hope and opportunity. Most of the newcomers were farmers, and they were content to work on plantations, first in Peru, and then in other countries, primarily Brazil. Many hoped that after a few years they could return to their homeland. Most remained.