Brazil’s Fisherwomen Mean Business

March 07, 2014
In Vila Castelo, a small town in the Brazilian state of Pará, fisherwomen are learning the ropes of fiscal management and entrepreneurship  Traditional fishing does not differ much today from what it has been since biblical times—a boat, a net, and a few men. Wait. Men? Maybe it has changed after all. At least in Vila Castelo, a tiny fishing village in Brazil’s state of Pará, women fish alongside men. 

Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

May 30, 2012
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

Tourism on the rise

November 01, 2011
Since 1994, the IDB has contributed to the creation of more than one million jobs by providing support during the different stages of the Tourism Development Program (PRODETUR) The Inter-American Development Bank has made important contributions to the development of Brazil’s tourism industry since 2004 with its support for the Northeast Tourism Development Program (PRODETUR Nordeste I).

IDB expects to provide more than $500 million to help Latin America and Caribbean prepare for natural disasters

March 10, 2011
Financial disaster preparedness is a growing concern in Latin America and the Caribbean. Last year the region saw devastating earthquakes in Chile and Haiti and an active hurricane season that impacted Central America and Mexico. In addition, the La Niña-related weather phenomenon has brought severe flooding to Venezuela, Colombia and Brazil, among others.

Latin America and the Caribbean see slower growth in next four years

March 19, 2009
Latin American and Caribbean leaders expect per capita income to fall or grow moderately in the 2009–2012  period and governments to rely more on financing from international institutions, according to a survey by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The expectations contrast sharply with the recent economic performance in the region, where product per capita grew 4.1 percent annually in the past five years.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Women on the challenges of being a scientist in Latin America and the Caribbean

January 16, 2007
Regardless of whether you’re a woman or a man, it’s not easy being a scientist in Latin America or the Caribbean (LAC).  Like anywhere else in the world, from the time one starts university it takes ten years of research and hard work just to earn a PhD in LAC, followed by several years working in postdoctoral fellowship positions.

Latin America and the Caribbean prepare for a pandemic

July 10, 2006
Worldwide, more than half the people who have contracted the H5N1 bird flu virus strain have died from the disease, according to the World Health Organization’s official tally. Just in 2006, 55 of the 85 people who contracted the disease died from it.  

Juscelino Kubitschek honored at the IDB

May 19, 2006
Brazil has played an integral role in the workings of the IDB from the beginning, not only as the Bank’s leading client in the region, but also as the catalyst for the IDB’s conception. “Without Brazil, the idea of an Inter-American Development Bank would never have been born,” said IDB President Luis Alberto Moreno during his inaugural address at the 47th Annual Board of Governors Meeting in Belo Horizonte, Brazil in April 2006.

Measuring the opposite of corruption

January 26, 2006
In many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, corruption is reluctantly accepted as part of the political workings of government, as an inevitable occurrence among those in power. However while everyone is well aware of its pervasiveness, the extent of corruption remains difficult to measure accurately, for it is hard to gauge what cannot be seen.