Innovative community participation supports program to fight environmental degradation of Brazil’s Atlantic forest

April 25, 2011
IDB helps promote conservation and provide better housing conditions for more than 8,000 families, many of them living in high-risk hillsides in Serra do Mar A $470 million project backed by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Brazilian state of Sao Paulo is seeking to protect what is left of the Atlantic forest while ensuring better livelihoods for the local communities. One of the key components of the project is to move residents to safer areas.

The IDB in Brazil at a glance

April 25, 2011
Highlights: support for the World Cup cities, environmental conservation, and infrastructure Brazil is one of the IDB’s founding member countries. Since 1961, the Bank has approved $40 billion in loans and guarantees for Brazil that have helped fund projects costing more than $110 billion. These projects, in the areas of ​​infrastructure, environment, institutional strengthening, and poverty reduction, have been carried out in close cooperation with all levels of government, civil society, and the private sector.

IDB invites feedback on new project impact mechanism for communities

May 06, 2009
The Inter-American Development Bank today unveiled its new proposed Independent Consultation and Investigation Mechanism (ICIM)—the process through which affected communities can voice concerns about an IDB project. The ICIM is a draft proposal, which is open to public consultation for civil society groups and other actors to express their suggestions and provide feedback. The idea is to enhance and speed up the investigation process of external allegations.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

A growing insurance market

April 17, 2007
The insurance market is a $3.4 trillion business worldwide. According to a recent study by the Brazilian National School of Insurance (Funenseg by its Portuguese acronym), this market is growing faster in emerging economies, and forecasts for total global revenue point to 2.5 percent average annual growth over the coming years.

Latin America and the Caribbean prepare for a pandemic

July 10, 2006
Worldwide, more than half the people who have contracted the H5N1 bird flu virus strain have died from the disease, according to the World Health Organization’s official tally. Just in 2006, 55 of the 85 people who contracted the disease died from it.  

Measuring the opposite of corruption

January 26, 2006
In many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, corruption is reluctantly accepted as part of the political workings of government, as an inevitable occurrence among those in power. However while everyone is well aware of its pervasiveness, the extent of corruption remains difficult to measure accurately, for it is hard to gauge what cannot be seen.

More growth or less inequality?

September 20, 2005
Increased investment, low inflation, an improved fiscal situation, decreased unemployment. Latin America and the Caribbean have been hearing plenty of good news the past 18 months. A group of renowned economists analyzed the situation at a seminar hosted by the IDB Research Department to honor IDB President Enrique V. Iglesias, who will retire on September 30. Iglesias himself opened the seminar, which was chaired by IDB Chief Economist Guillermo Calvo, with the participation of Ricardo Hausmann, Michael Mussa, José Antonio Ocampo and John Williamson.

Racial and ethnic disparities in health in Latin America

May 03, 2005
Are Afro-descendants and indigenous peoples in better or worse health than Latin Americans of European descent? Four new studies on race, ethnicity and health in Latin America produced some unexpected and sometimes contradictory results. In poor rural villages in Mexico, for instance, indigenous groups report being in better health than non-indigenous groups, said Ashu Handa, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He took data from the PROGRESA cash transfer program for the poor and compared it with the National Health Survey findings.

A marriage of convenience

March 24, 2005
The global market economy, now embracing over 5 billion people, is ready for a marriage between Latin America and Japan, according to Makoto Utsumi, President and CEO of the Japan Credit Rating Agency, Ltd.