IDB fuels impact investing in Latin America

February 13, 2012
More than $110 million of impact investing resources were mobilized by the IDB over the past 18 months to finance profitable projects that bring about social change Despite stellar economic performance in recent years, Latin America and the Caribbean still have a long way to go to address pressing development needs, such as reducing poverty, improving educational outcomes and enhancing access to reliable health services.

Paraguay and the IDB: partners in development

December 15, 2011
Paraguay is a founding member of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Bank’s partner in development Through an ongoing process of cooperation, financing has been provided to the Paraguay to carry out major works, which have spurred the country’s economy. This year, the Bank’s portfolio of projects in execution in Paraguay totals 27 sovereign guarantee operations for $755.27 million, of which $445.9 million are pending disbursement.

Improving housing conditions in Paraguay

June 27, 2011
An innovative way of allowing low-income families to afford home improvements

IDB backs base-of-the-pyramid business models in Latin America and the Caribbean

March 09, 2011
Projects aim to boost income and improve quality of life of low-income people with companies, governments and NGOs The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is teaming up with companies, governments and non-governmental organizations in novel projects to generate new business models that provide low-income people in Latin America and the Caribbean with quality goods and services, improved earning opportunities and enhanced living standards.

Mesoamerica renews push towards integration

October 25, 2010
The presidents of Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Colombia and the Dominican Republic will meet tomorrow, Oct. 26, in Cartagena, Colombia at the XII Summit of the Tuxtla Mechanism for Dialogue and Coordination. The heads of state will be informed of the progress made by the Mesoamerica Project in terms of regional integration and will decide further courses of action.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

September 27, 2010
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

Central America's integration is in full swing

July 21, 2010
In late July, the first substation of the Central American Electrical Interconnection System (SIEPAC) is opening in Costa Rica. A week later, the substation in Panama will be ready to operate. Towers, lines and cables are already in place, so the southern section of the nascent Central American electricity market will soon be a reality. PAC53 - Road from La Chorrera to Arraijan, in Panama.

Sustainable energy for Haiti, Bahamas and Barbados

May 21, 2010
Tens of thousands of Haitians who lost their homes in Port-au-Prince have left the city and migrated to rural villages or temporary encampments. International aid organizations are currently helping to construct clinics, schools, administrative centers and warehouses in some of these villages, which are located in remote areas without access to basic services.

Life in an uncertain climate

December 07, 2009
Climate change has the potential to undermine many of the advances in social and economic development that Latin American and Caribbean countries have made in recent decades. With support from the IDB, the region’s governments are designing strategies for adapting to different climate change scenarios, applying new technologies to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), and redoubling efforts to achieve sustainable development. Threats to the region

Latin American economies stymied by high transportation costs, IDB study shows

November 27, 2009
High transportation costs in Latin America and the Caribbean undermine trade and have harmful impacts on the productivity of the entire economy, protecting inefficient companies and preventing competitive producers from expanding their output, according to a newly release study by the Inter-American Development Bank.