Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

A life beyond crime

August 27, 2012
A Jamaican citizen security program targets women involved in gangs For Pauline Crooks, quitting the Montego Bay gang that had helped her to put food on the table for six years wasn’t a quick or an easy decision. The single mother of three continued showing up at her “workplace”— where the gangsters ran lottery scams—even after she joined a parenting course offered by the Citizen Security and Justice Program (CSJP), an initiative launched in 2007 by Jamaica’s government to bring down crime in the island’s most violent communities.

Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

May 30, 2012
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

Improving living conditions in low-income neighborhoods in Rio de Janeiro

March 23, 2011
IDB details impact of second phase of Favela-Bairro program The Favela-Bairro program of the the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has helped improve living conditions for many poor inhabitants of urban slums in areas like income and availability of social services, a review of the program shows.

Latin America and the Caribbean see slower growth in next four years

March 19, 2009
Latin American and Caribbean leaders expect per capita income to fall or grow moderately in the 2009–2012  period and governments to rely more on financing from international institutions, according to a survey by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The expectations contrast sharply with the recent economic performance in the region, where product per capita grew 4.1 percent annually in the past five years.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

The underserved low-income market in the Caribbean

May 25, 2007
Close to 90 percent of the population in the Caribbean––over 11 million people, mostly in Haiti, Jamaica and Suriname—has an annual income lower than $3,260 or under $300 a month measured in purchasing-power-parity (PPP) dollars. This startling statistics comes from a new report presented at the seminar Opportunities for the Majority (OM) in the Caribbean, held by the IDB in Montego Bay, Jamaica, on May 17—18.

Social programs or wage increases?

February 23, 2007
Brazilian social programs such as “Bolsa Familia” (Family Allowance) or “Salario Familia” (Family Wage) are much more effective tools to fight poverty and reduce income inequality than raising the minimum wage, according to a new study by the Institute of Applied Economic Research (IPEA), presented at IDB headquarters in Washington, DC.

Saying no to hunger

March 14, 2006
Three meals per day. That is the goal that Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva wants to achieve before the end of this year for all his compatriots. The person in charge of eliminating hunger in Brazil is Patrus Ananias de Sousa, Minister of Social Development and the Fight against Hunger.   “Brazil isn’t a poor country, but it’s a country that is home to many poor people, thanks to centuries of social injustice and inequality,” de Sousa said recently at the IDB.

Latinos from the Far East

March 01, 2006
By Charo QuesadaWhen Mexicans or Panamanians say they are “going to the Chino for groceries” they are not talking about some Chinese individual that happened to open a business around the corner from where they live. In their countries, the Chinese store has become an institution with a long tradition, providing a large and convenient selection of basic products, at low cost and with convenient business hours.