Sustainable energy helps reduce costly reliance on fossil fuels in many Caribbean States

September 27, 2010
By Christina MacCulloch The international economic crisis, has hurt the Caribbean economies, mainly by affecting tourism. This has brought a sense of urgency to the region’s need to rely less on costly imported fossil fuels. The need for more energy efficiency is greater than ever, and so is the potential.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

September 27, 2010
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

Sustainable energy for Haiti, Bahamas and Barbados

May 21, 2010
Tens of thousands of Haitians who lost their homes in Port-au-Prince have left the city and migrated to rural villages or temporary encampments. International aid organizations are currently helping to construct clinics, schools, administrative centers and warehouses in some of these villages, which are located in remote areas without access to basic services.

Latin America and the Caribbean see slower growth in next four years

March 19, 2009
Latin American and Caribbean leaders expect per capita income to fall or grow moderately in the 2009–2012  period and governments to rely more on financing from international institutions, according to a survey by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The expectations contrast sharply with the recent economic performance in the region, where product per capita grew 4.1 percent annually in the past five years.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

February 26, 2009
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

The underserved low-income market in the Caribbean

May 25, 2007
Close to 90 percent of the population in the Caribbean––over 11 million people, mostly in Haiti, Jamaica and Suriname—has an annual income lower than $3,260 or under $300 a month measured in purchasing-power-parity (PPP) dollars. This startling statistics comes from a new report presented at the seminar Opportunities for the Majority (OM) in the Caribbean, held by the IDB in Montego Bay, Jamaica, on May 17—18.

Solar lights that won’t go out

April 01, 2006
By Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho*For Katalina Erlinda Peña de Romero’s family, sunset used to mean an abrupt end to all activity. Their house in the rural municipality of Caluco, in the Salvadoran department of Sonsonate, did not have electricity, and the family income was so meager that they often could not afford to buy kerosene to light lamps.

Lights and shadows

December 01, 2005
By Milagros Belgrano Rawson

More growth or less inequality?

September 20, 2005
Increased investment, low inflation, an improved fiscal situation, decreased unemployment. Latin America and the Caribbean have been hearing plenty of good news the past 18 months. A group of renowned economists analyzed the situation at a seminar hosted by the IDB Research Department to honor IDB President Enrique V. Iglesias, who will retire on September 30. Iglesias himself opened the seminar, which was chaired by IDB Chief Economist Guillermo Calvo, with the participation of Ricardo Hausmann, Michael Mussa, José Antonio Ocampo and John Williamson.