Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Beyond the soccer fields

July 05, 2010
What does the U.S. winning goal at the end of its match with Algeria in the World Cup have to do with youth employment in Latin America? Or what does the composure with which the English goalkeeper accepted a referee’s mistake that cost his team the victory have to do with the self-esteem of adolescents in Brazil? 

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Youth get training to change course of life

December 12, 2006
Jose Luis Pereira, 26 years old, is the older of six siblings who live in Carabayllo, a suburb of recent expansion and one of the poorest districts of the Peruvian capital. About 150,000 people live there in poverty amidst a lack good employment opportunities.

The effects of child labor on learning

July 03, 2003
Latin American countries have made a conscious effort to increase the percentage of children receiving formal instruction. Nevertheless, according to the latest household survey statistics, a significant amount of children combine school with work. For instance, in Brazil, Ecuador and Peru, the great majority of children are enrolled in school (95, 87 and 97 percent, respectively), but still a high percentage of children work (13, 34 and 28 percent).