Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

A water turnaround in Haiti

November 03, 2011
Before the project started in 2008, Saint Marc had running water for nine hours a week, at best. At present service is up to 10 hours a day—the highest average in any urban area in Haiti.

Central America's integration is in full swing

July 21, 2010
In late July, the first substation of the Central American Electrical Interconnection System (SIEPAC) is opening in Costa Rica. A week later, the substation in Panama will be ready to operate. Towers, lines and cables are already in place, so the southern section of the nascent Central American electricity market will soon be a reality. PAC53 - Road from La Chorrera to Arraijan, in Panama.

Mesoamerica Advances

July 29, 2009
The regional integration initiative known as Proyecto Mesoamérica is gaining momentum. It was a central item on the agenda of the XI Cumbre de Tuxla (an annual summit of regional heads of state), which concluded in Costa Rica today. Last week news reports focused on a proposed multimodal transportation strategy to improve the region’s competitiveness. And last June, the IDB announced the second phase of a project known as Tránsito Internacional de Mercancía, which will introduce a unified customs system for use on the borders of all Mesoamerican countries.

IDB invites feedback on new project impact mechanism for communities

May 06, 2009
The Inter-American Development Bank today unveiled its new proposed Independent Consultation and Investigation Mechanism (ICIM)—the process through which affected communities can voice concerns about an IDB project. The ICIM is a draft proposal, which is open to public consultation for civil society groups and other actors to express their suggestions and provide feedback. The idea is to enhance and speed up the investigation process of external allegations.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

April 21, 2005
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”

Feedback sought on new IDB Environment and Safeguards Policy

November 22, 2004
The IDB is developing its Environment and Safeguards Compliance Policy. The goal of the new policy is to help advance the Bank's mission for promoting sustainable development and reducing poverty across the Latin American and Caribbean region. The specific objectives of the policy are to maximize development benefits and environmental sustainability outcomes in Bank operations and activities; to manage risks to ensure that all Bank operations and activities are environmentally viable, and to improve and promote corporate environmental responsibility within the Bank.

A multilateral response to rising crime

June 21, 2004
Widespread violence, rising crime rates and terrorism contribute to create a climate of global insecurity that threatens many Latin American countries' hardly-earned democratic stability. National States must achieve much greater effectiveness and legitimacy in handling security issues in order to stop the growing popular disbelief in democratic institutions, which – as Latinobarometro's polls show with sobering regularity – are increasingly blamed for economic and social problems that affect Latin America.