IDB more than doubles pipeline of projects financed by the Global Environmental Facility

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has more than doubled over the past year its pipeline of projects in climate change, biodiversity and land conservation, and international waters, under its partnership with the Global Environment Facility (GEF).

Sustainable energy for Haiti, Bahamas and Barbados

Tens of thousands of Haitians who lost their homes in Port-au-Prince have left the city and migrated to rural villages or temporary encampments. International aid organizations are currently helping to construct clinics, schools, administrative centers and warehouses in some of these villages, which are located in remote areas without access to basic services.

Life in an uncertain climate

Climate change has the potential to undermine many of the advances in social and economic development that Latin American and Caribbean countries have made in recent decades. With support from the IDB, the region’s governments are designing strategies for adapting to different climate change scenarios, applying new technologies to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), and redoubling efforts to achieve sustainable development.

Threats to the region

The invisible force propelling green energy

Whether it’s a new kind of solar panel or a biochemical process that turns algae into fuel, breakthroughs in renewable energy are often portrayed as a triumph of technology and innovation.

But when it comes to actually building a large scale renewable energy project, the most critical ingredient is an unglamorous service that has been around for centuries. Loans or bonds with long maturities—meaning that they can be paid back in five years or more—are crucial for the success of start-up companies and infrastructure projects in general.

Hope for Haiti

Haiti produces some of the world’s best mangoes but around half of the crop is lost before it reaches markets. Only about 10 percent of the fruit is exported. And, paradoxically for a country with 10 million mango trees, Haiti imports mango juice.

A roof for Haiti

GRAND GOAVE, Haiti – Maryse Auguste says she’s happy with her new home, a tidy, one-room shelter built after the January 12 earthquake by young volunteers of Un Techo Para Mi País (Spanish for A Roof for My Country), a nongovernmental organization specialized in providing temporary housing to the desperately poor in 16 Latin American countries.

Back in business

This season’s first shipments of organic mangos from the Carifresh fruit packing plant left for the United States the last week of April, almost two months later than usual. But this is not a normal season.