New currents in water resources management

Friday, August 1, 1997 - 03:00
When Latin America's population was smaller, when few of its cities numbered more than a million people, and when its industries were in their infancy, conflicts over water were relatively infrequent. There was generally plenty to go around. When more water was needed, be it for agriculture, energy, residential or other uses, the solution was fairly simple: build more infrastructure to increase supplies.But Latin America has changed. Its rapidly growing population, burgeoning cities, fast-paced industrialization, and advances in agricultural technology are now straining water resources.

Ingenuity saves dam

Friday, August 1, 1997 - 03:00
Three years ago, Honduras' Francisco Morazán hydroelectric project, the country's main source of electricity, was on the verge of collapsing into a $775 million pile of rubble. "Water was leaking everywhere," recalls the Inter-American Development Bank's William Large, who was sent to Honduras on an emergency mission to see how the IDB could help save the project it had originally financed. "Without a doubt, it looked like the power house would flood."

An economy with a split personality

Friday, August 1, 1997 - 03:00
Chile occupies a relatively high position in the annual rankings on economic competitiveness issued by international think tanks. But when the country's performance in these indexes is broken down into its constituent parts, Chile shows a stunning dichotomy.

The risks of partial integration

Friday, August 1, 1997 - 03:00
While virtually all Latin American and Caribbean governments have expressed qualified approval for the creation of a hemispheric free-trade zone, debate rages as to the near-term benefits that such an arrangement woutld have for individual countries.

The knowledge dividend

Friday, August 1, 1997 - 03:00
Economists have long assumed that rising levels of education contribute to economic development. But until recently, little was known about how greater educational achievement actually affects national productivity and growth. Although that relationship will always be hard to quantify, the 1997 edition of the IDB report Economic and Social Progress in Latin America, due out in September, shows just how much of a return the region can expect from investments in education.

Fine weaving as a way of life

Friday, August 1, 1997 - 03:00
Lidia Chile does not consider herself to be a fancy dresser, and she certainly is not rich. Yet she would never think of leaving her house in Santo Domingo Xenacoj wearing anything less than a hand embroidered blouse worth many weeks' earnings.

Beef exports are back

Friday, August 1, 1997 - 03:00
People are always cheered by news of sickness in retreat, but Argentina's recently recognized victory over hoof-and-mouth disease, a highly contagious ailment that can kill cattle, was celebrated with particular fervor. Argentines are justifiably proud of the lean, tender meat produced by cattle fed on the Pampa's lush grasslands. But while the meat's quality is recognized abroad, and Argentina was once among the world's premier meat exporters, the country's beef industry has been severely affected over the last 60 years because of the stubborn presence of hoof-and-mouth disease.

Public access preserves ruins

Friday, August 1, 1997 - 03:00
Priceless cultural remains from a magnificent though mysterious period in the history of the Aymara people have been saved from looters and the ravages of time in the highlands of Bolivia, thanks to a new road. The preservation work was carried out at 15 sites in the areas of Warijana and Pujrata in the Andean altiplano, as part of an IDB-financed project to construct the Patacamaya-Tambo Quemado highway, which links Bolivia with Chile.

From trashheap to urban oasis

Friday, August 1, 1997 - 03:00
For years, Carolina Fernández Rodríguez endured a sore throat that had no obvious medical explanation. But Fernández, who lives on the outskirts of the Ecuadorean coastal city of Guayaquil and told her story to reporter Jorge Alvarado of Expreso newspaper, had a theory about her ailment. She called it "La Chamba."

Denmark joins the Inter-American Investment Corporation

Friday, August 1, 1997 - 03:00
Denmark became the thirty-fifth member of the Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC) at a signing ceremony held July 16 at IDB headquarters in Washington, D.C. Sven Boje Madsen, Denmark's Chargé d'affaires in the U.S., signed the official record of membership and added Denmark's name to the Agreement Establishing the Inter-American Investment Corporation. The official record of membership was also signed by Enrique V. Iglesias, IDB president and chairman of the IIC board.