IDB fuels impact investing in Latin America

February 13, 2012
More than $110 million of impact investing resources were mobilized by the IDB over the past 18 months to finance profitable projects that bring about social change Despite stellar economic performance in recent years, Latin America and the Caribbean still have a long way to go to address pressing development needs, such as reducing poverty, improving educational outcomes and enhancing access to reliable health services.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

February 26, 2009
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

Self-help for the poor through microcredit

February 26, 2009
Microenterprise and small business companies account for 59 percent of El Salvador’s work force and 49 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product. Yet the vast majority of these firms, particularly those with small incomes and in rural areas, do not have access to credit. Experience has demonstrated that properly managed microcredit programs can achieve an adequate return on capital while fulfilling a social need, enabling low-income producers to survive and expand.

The Duty of Champions

April 16, 2008
By Diego Fonseca

Acting smart when income grows

March 27, 2008
The expansive economic cycle in Latin America rests largely on the rise of key commodity prices, but experience suggests caution in thriving years.

Basic Services for the Low-Income Majority

September 28, 2007
From Microenterprise Americas magazine, Fall 2007 By Paul Constance*This article is presented as a website preview. The Fall 2007 issue of Microenterprise Americas will be presented at the X Inter-American Forum on Microenterprise in El Salvador, October 3-5. 

A slimmer bottle leads to fatter profits

June 01, 2007
Small business owner Miguel Maccagno sits in his factory office in the low-income neighborhood of Matanza outside Buenos Aires, examining identical-looking plastic bottles for the juice drinks his plant produces and pondering their impact on its competitiveness. By shaving 14 grams off the bottles' weight, he can lower costs enough for his firm, Agroindustrias Río Tercero, to compete with the large U.S., Brazilian and Chilean firms that have cornered the low end of the local market.

A hand up for small and medium-sized businesses in Central America, Panama and the Dominican Republic

January 26, 2007
The Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC), a member of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) Group, will launch FINPYME (Financiación Innovadora de PYME), an innovative program for financing small and medium-size companies, in five Central American countries, Panama, and the Dominican Republic starting February 1. The initiative seeks to improve access to financing for smaller companies

Reaching the Majority: Promising Steps, Future Actions

March 06, 2006
Social programs have at worst downplayed the interactions between program requirements and rates of underdocumentation, or at best fashioned awkward solutions to get around these problems (such as inventing a new identification code for each family in each project). However, there are some promising trends in the region as private, public and international entities take steps to reach those who have been invisible to the system.