IDB fuels impact investing in Latin America

February 13, 2012
More than $110 million of impact investing resources were mobilized by the IDB over the past 18 months to finance profitable projects that bring about social change Despite stellar economic performance in recent years, Latin America and the Caribbean still have a long way to go to address pressing development needs, such as reducing poverty, improving educational outcomes and enhancing access to reliable health services.

Paraguay and the IDB: partners in development

December 15, 2011
Paraguay is a founding member of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Bank’s partner in development Through an ongoing process of cooperation, financing has been provided to the Paraguay to carry out major works, which have spurred the country’s economy. This year, the Bank’s portfolio of projects in execution in Paraguay totals 27 sovereign guarantee operations for $755.27 million, of which $445.9 million are pending disbursement.

Improving housing conditions in Paraguay

June 27, 2011
An innovative way of allowing low-income families to afford home improvements

IDB backs base-of-the-pyramid business models in Latin America and the Caribbean

March 09, 2011
Projects aim to boost income and improve quality of life of low-income people with companies, governments and NGOs The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is teaming up with companies, governments and non-governmental organizations in novel projects to generate new business models that provide low-income people in Latin America and the Caribbean with quality goods and services, improved earning opportunities and enhanced living standards.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

February 26, 2009
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

Acting smart when income grows

March 27, 2008
The expansive economic cycle in Latin America rests largely on the rise of key commodity prices, but experience suggests caution in thriving years.

FIDA: Turning Crops to Cash in Paraguay

December 26, 2007
FIDA, a Paraguayan rural development foundation, works with extremely poor indigenous families living in a 30,000-square-kilometer area of the parched Central Chaco savanna. FIDA won last year’s Inter-American Award for Excellence in Business Development for its sound management and innovative efforts to raise the living standards of its members—Indian communities that have traditionally been hunters and gatherers and have turned to subsistence and cash crop farming on small plots of land.

A slimmer bottle leads to fatter profits

June 01, 2007
Small business owner Miguel Maccagno sits in his factory office in the low-income neighborhood of Matanza outside Buenos Aires, examining identical-looking plastic bottles for the juice drinks his plant produces and pondering their impact on its competitiveness. By shaving 14 grams off the bottles' weight, he can lower costs enough for his firm, Agroindustrias Río Tercero, to compete with the large U.S., Brazilian and Chilean firms that have cornered the low end of the local market.

Latin America moves ahead despite external threats

October 31, 2005
Many fear the possibility of interest rate hikes and a global recession if the “Chinese addiction” to buying dollars comes to an end, expressed the IDB Chief Economist, Guillermo Calvo. But the seven largest economies in Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela, also known as the LAC-7) are currently growing fast. Stock prices went up 174% in the past two years, bank credit and foreign investment are increasing, and commodity prices have also enjoyed a boost.