The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

The Mayan world in the digital era

February 09, 2007
The past and future of Guatemala merge in the new IDB Cultural Center art exhibition, honoring the host country of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors of the Inter-American Development Bank. Unlike previous art exhibitions at the Cultural Center, the exhibition “Guatemala: Past and Future” is made up of multimedia presentations that portray key elements of Mayan culture in digitally restored versions.

Improving avenues towards post-secondary and higher education for indigenous people

April 12, 2006
Considering the sheer diversity of indigenous peoples and languages in Ecuador, Colombia, Guatemala and Nicaragua, with 22 different languages spoken among the majority (60 percent) Mayan population in Guatemala alone, it seems logical that terms like multiethnic, multilingual and culturally pluralistic would be used to describe their national compositions.

Goodbye to rural poverty

March 20, 2006
Agriculture alone can't put an end to rural poverty. That is one of the conclusions of the studies directed by Hans Cansen, researcher and Central American coordinator, and Shenggen Fan, director of government and development strategies at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Hans Cansen centered his study on three Central American countries: Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. His goal was to describe the assets of rural populations in order to understand their impact on economic growth and living standards and propose strategies for rural investment.

Using the classroom to fight for peace

January 01, 2006
By Charo QuesadaWhen war, natural disasters, economic crises or violence afflict a society, the education system is usually one of the first institutions to fall into disarray. Yet case after case has shown that in the wake of these disturbances, the presence and continuity of educational programs is crucial to rebuilding the social fabric.

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

April 21, 2005
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”

Education can't wait

March 05, 2004
Even in times of war and civil strife, governments, civil society organizations, communities and donor countries must continue to place a high priority on education. The investment will pay off when the inevitable peace process arrives, and society and the country will be in a much better position to heal the wounds of conflict and regain momentum for economic and social development.

Improving teaching quality in Latin America

May 07, 2003
Education systems in Latin America face a myriad of challenges, including the challenging conditions encountered by elementary school teachers. The teachers guide their students through a critical stage of development in which everything learned leaves an imprint and opens venues for new knowledge.