Mexico’s Salud Digna: Preventive Care at Affordable Prices

April 08, 2013
One of the biggest challenges for public health systems in Latin America and the Caribbean is the rise of chronic and non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and cancer. Overwhelmed by growing demand, public primary care units and hospitals are unable to provide timely diagnostic services such as blood tests and mammograms that would allow low-income patients to identify and treat their conditions.

Cost-Effective Investment in Neglected Tropical Diseases in Mexico

March 04, 2013
At the end of 2011, Maria Rodriguez, who lives in the mountains in Huixtán in Chiapas, Mexico, started having such serious problems with her eyes that she could barely do her daily chores such as cooking and preparing her children for school.

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

IDB integrates efforts to fight Neglected Tropical Diseases

April 23, 2012
Efforts include actions to prevent and control neglected tropical diseases, currently affecting more than 200 million people in Latin America and the Caribbean

New hospital improves care for patients in Mexico’s Tepic

October 06, 2011
Tertiary care hospital built with IDB financing gives access to state-of-the-art care Not long ago, patients in need of specialized services in Tepic, the capital of the Mexican state of Nayarit, had to travel for over one hour by ambulance to get treatment in the nearest hospital in Guadalajara. Such long distance added significant health risks and financial costs for patients seeking both specialized and emergency care.

Healthcare squad members saving lives in Chiapas

September 16, 2011
The IDB tropical diseases program provides services to 130,000 people in 13 indigenous communities of Mexico Marcela Gómez is a trilingual healthcare squad member: she speaks Tzotzil, Tzeltal, and Spanish. Along with her fellow healthcare squad members, she covers kilometers of jungle paths day after day to reach the most remote homes in southern Mexico. On their journey, they dodge dog and mosquito bites, but nothing makes them lose sight of the objective: to save lives.

The Caribbean and the IDB at a Glance

September 27, 2010
The IDB member countries of the English-speaking Caribbean – The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago – along with Dutch-speaking Suriname, are brought together by commerce, geography, history and traditions. Their economic situation and development challenges, however, may vary widely.

Central America's integration is in full swing

July 21, 2010
In late July, the first substation of the Central American Electrical Interconnection System (SIEPAC) is opening in Costa Rica. A week later, the substation in Panama will be ready to operate. Towers, lines and cables are already in place, so the southern section of the nascent Central American electricity market will soon be a reality. PAC53 - Road from La Chorrera to Arraijan, in Panama.

Uniting to closing the gap in access to life-saving health in Mesoamerica

June 14, 2010
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carlos Slim Health Institute and Spain will contribute $50 million each to Salud Mesoamerica 2015, an initiative designed and executed by the IDB. Over the next five years, Salud Mesoamerica 2015 will promote projects to improve health among the poor in Central America and southern Mexico, aiming at reducing the gaps in access to health services in the region. At age five, Mesoamerica’s poor children are on average six centimeters shorter than their richer peers.

Mesoamerica Advances

July 29, 2009
The regional integration initiative known as Proyecto Mesoamérica is gaining momentum. It was a central item on the agenda of the XI Cumbre de Tuxla (an annual summit of regional heads of state), which concluded in Costa Rica today. Last week news reports focused on a proposed multimodal transportation strategy to improve the region’s competitiveness. And last June, the IDB announced the second phase of a project known as Tránsito Internacional de Mercancía, which will introduce a unified customs system for use on the borders of all Mesoamerican countries.