Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

October 15, 2012
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Human trafficking's dirty profits and huge costs

November 02, 2006
Poverty, unemployment and lack of opportunity force millions of people to look for a better life by moving away from the places they call home. In Latin America and the Caribbean, illegal emigration is a huge problem, and it goes hand-in-hand with people trafficking and exploitation—pointed out IDB modernization of the state specialist Nybia Laguarda, during a presentation at the Bank’s headquarters in Washington, DC.

Education can't wait

March 05, 2004
Even in times of war and civil strife, governments, civil society organizations, communities and donor countries must continue to place a high priority on education. The investment will pay off when the inevitable peace process arrives, and society and the country will be in a much better position to heal the wounds of conflict and regain momentum for economic and social development.

The effects of child labor on learning

July 03, 2003
Latin American countries have made a conscious effort to increase the percentage of children receiving formal instruction. Nevertheless, according to the latest household survey statistics, a significant amount of children combine school with work. For instance, in Brazil, Ecuador and Peru, the great majority of children are enrolled in school (95, 87 and 97 percent, respectively), but still a high percentage of children work (13, 34 and 28 percent).