Mexico’s Salud Digna: Preventive Care at Affordable Prices

Monday, April 8, 2013 - 03:00
One of the biggest challenges for public health systems in Latin America and the Caribbean is the rise of chronic and non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and cancer. Overwhelmed by growing demand, public primary care units and hospitals are unable to provide timely diagnostic services such as blood tests and mammograms that would allow low-income patients to identify and treat their conditions.

How Land Titling Can Boost Access to Credit for Farmers in Ecuador

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 03:00
For more than 70 years, the Herrera family has owned and farmed 300 hectares in the municipality of Pimampiro in northern Ecuador. The family had a deed for the land but it provided few details about the exact property lines, which areas had been set aside as protected areas, and in which parts farming was allowed.

Finding Ways to Change Eating Habits in Bolivia

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Nearly one in three children under the age of five in Bolivia suffers from stunting—a result of chronic malnutrition—the second highest rate in Latin America and the Caribbean. Poverty and lack of health systems that provide the right supplements are the most commonly cited reasons for the problem, but lack of awareness and behavioral issues related to nutrition are factors as well.

Cost-Effective Investment in Neglected Tropical Diseases in Mexico

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
At the end of 2011, Maria Rodriguez, who lives in the mountains in Huixtán in Chiapas, Mexico, started having such serious problems with her eyes that she could barely do her daily chores such as cooking and preparing her children for school.

Better Irrigation and Training to Improve Crop Yields in Artibonite

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Since she was a child, Marie Bertha Alexis, a 55-year old rice farmer, dreamed of improving the lives of her friends and neighbors. She knew the only solution would come from the land in her native Artibonite river valley, Haiti’s principal agricultural region. But her efforts were stymied by decaying irrigation systems and lack of knowledge on how to best grow crops such as rice.

Learning What Works to Boost Agricultural Productivity in the Dominican Republic

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
In the Dominican Republic, the agricultural sector’s share in the economy has been in steady decline because of slowing productivity. Over the past two decades, the sector’s share has fallen from 12 percent to 7.6 percent of gross domestic product. This has constrained the government’s efforts to improve living conditions in rural areas, home to a third of the population, half of them living below the poverty line.

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 03:00
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Haiti agriculture: growing investments

Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 03:00
Highlights from rural development projects funded by the Inter-American Development Bank in Haiti Agriculture remains a key sector for Haiti, as half of its population lives in rural areas. Together with other donors, the IDB supports the Haitian government’s national agricultural plan, which seeks to address the sector’s structural problems. The IDB’s sector knowledge and experience from before the earthquake define its comparative strength and to make the sector a continued priority over the next four years.

IDB integrates efforts to fight Neglected Tropical Diseases

Monday, April 23, 2012 - 03:00
Efforts include actions to prevent and control neglected tropical diseases, currently affecting more than 200 million people in Latin America and the Caribbean

Two Years On, Haiti Turns a Page

Monday, January 9, 2012 - 03:00
As it approaches the second anniversary of the January 2010 earthquake, Haiti is determined to show the world that it is “open for business”