Brazil’s Fisherwomen Mean Business

Friday, March 7, 2014 - 03:00
In Vila Castelo, a small town in the Brazilian state of Pará, fisherwomen are learning the ropes of fiscal management and entrepreneurship  Traditional fishing does not differ much today from what it has been since biblical times—a boat, a net, and a few men. Wait. Men? Maybe it has changed after all. At least in Vila Castelo, a tiny fishing village in Brazil’s state of Pará, women fish alongside men. 

Women Forge a Future for Apartadó

Monday, March 3, 2014 - 03:00
In the Colombian town of Apartadó, women are shaping a new beginning after years of violence Bullets, poverty, and unemployment have taken a big toll on many locations in Colombia.  Take Apartadó, for example—a 167,000 people municipality in northwestern Colombia ravaged by a fierce, decades-old guerrilla war that has forced a large portion of its population to leave. Fully 60 percent of those who have chosen to stay barely scrape a living below the poverty line. 

Latin American public banks show strong potential to help address climate change and foster productive development

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - 03:00
Public development banks represent 10 percent of lending in Latin America and the Caribbean Public Development Banks (PDBs) in Latin America and the Caribbean provide more than $700 billion in loans annually and possess the operational and financial heft to expand into areas such as climate change mitigation and productive development policies, according to a study released today by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

Providing Credit to Latin America’s “Missing Middle”

Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 03:00
Join the discussion on twitter using #devthatworks There are approximately 34 million businesses in Latin America and the Caribbean, most of them small, informal, and with limited access to credit. Since they are unable to provide collateral, a reliable financial history, or accounting information, these businesses cannot meet the financial information requirements of commercial banks to obtain loans to improve and expand their operations.

Some Latin Americans see improvements in government services

Thursday, April 11, 2013 - 03:00
Service supermarkets in Colombia, results-based monitoring in Brazil, centralized certificates in Chile are making a difference in peoples lives

Maximum Return on Public Investments in Suriname

Monday, April 1, 2013 - 03:00
Managing public investment is one of the most challenging jobs for governments, particularly in the developing world. For public investment to effectively generate development, countries must have the technical and institutional capacity to ensure that the projects selected have the highest economic and social rate of return.

How Land Titling Can Boost Access to Credit for Farmers in Ecuador

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 03:00
For more than 70 years, the Herrera family has owned and farmed 300 hectares in the municipality of Pimampiro in northern Ecuador. The family had a deed for the land but it provided few details about the exact property lines, which areas had been set aside as protected areas, and in which parts farming was allowed.

Pioneering Data Initiative Aims to Measure Public Safety Conditions

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Determining the murder rate for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean is not an easy task. There are several sources that collect such data, from Interior Ministries to police and health departments, and each one uses a different methodology. As a result, murder rates can vary widely—the difference can be as high as 50 percent depending on the source and year.

Banking the Unbanked in Colombia

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Approximately 35 percent of the Colombian adult population has no access to any formal financial services and are considered “unbanked,” according to the Colombian Banking Association. Some 79 percent of adults have no access to credit cards.

Better Irrigation and Training to Improve Crop Yields in Artibonite

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Since she was a child, Marie Bertha Alexis, a 55-year old rice farmer, dreamed of improving the lives of her friends and neighbors. She knew the only solution would come from the land in her native Artibonite river valley, Haiti’s principal agricultural region. But her efforts were stymied by decaying irrigation systems and lack of knowledge on how to best grow crops such as rice.