IDB integrates efforts to fight Neglected Tropical Diseases

April 23, 2012
Efforts include actions to prevent and control neglected tropical diseases, currently affecting more than 200 million people in Latin America and the Caribbean

IDB ramps up financing for green projects in Latin America and the Caribbean

March 16, 2012
Participate in Twitter using #IDBmtg Bank approved record $736 million in loans last year for private sector projects in renewable energy and energy efficiency The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is ramping up lending for private sector projects related to renewable energy and energy efficiency to help bridge the gap for long-term financing for green investments in Latin America and the Caribbean.

IDB seminars in Medellín to discuss impacts of global financial crisis

March 23, 2009
The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is promoting the discussion and analysis of the impacts of the global financial crisis in Latin America and the Caribbean during seminars in Medellín, Colombia, related to the 50th Annual Meeting of the Bank'sBoard of Governors. The discussions will feature government leaders such as Colombian President Alvaro Uribe, Zhou Xiaochuan and governor of the People’s Bank of China, as well as noted experts such as Robert Merton, a Nobel Prize-winner economist.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

February 26, 2009
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

A new way to pave city streets

February 26, 2009
Throughout Latin America low-income neighborhoods have difficulty in paving city streets. Municipalities are typically short of funds, and many informal urban settlements have not yet been properly incorporated into the tax base. An innovative solution has been devised by CEMEX, a multinational cement company based in Mexico, to mobilize both public and private resources to pave streets in low-income neighborhoods.

The growing role of Latin American currencies

June 23, 2008
When the sovereign debts of both Brazil and Peru were upgraded to investment levels by international rating agencies in the first quarter of 2008, the two nations joined an exclusive club of financial winners whose other two Latin American members were Mexico and Chile. Mexico’s debt became investment grade in 2000, while Chile’s achieved that status in 1992.

A hand up for small and medium-sized businesses in Central America, Panama and the Dominican Republic

January 26, 2007
The Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC), a member of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) Group, will launch FINPYME (Financiación Innovadora de PYME), an innovative program for financing small and medium-size companies, in five Central American countries, Panama, and the Dominican Republic starting February 1. The initiative seeks to improve access to financing for smaller companies

Pooling resources through Hometown Associations

May 31, 2006
Some say that the origins of Chicago’s Mexican community can be traced down to the city block, with Michoacanos living on one and Zacatecanos on another nearby. Whether this is an accurate depiction of Mexican migrant settlement patterns or not, the idea of maintaining a strong connection with one’s roots is an important part of the lives of many migrants, and is also the driving force behind the formation of transnational migrant organizations, or Hometown Associations (HTAs).

Water Works

March 17, 2006
By LUIS ALBERTO MORENO   When delegates gather at the 4th World Water Forum in Mexico City, many will be asking whether the private sector still has a role to play in solving the critical sanitation and potable water problems of the developing world.