Women Forge a Future for Apartadó

Monday, March 3, 2014 - 03:00
In the Colombian town of Apartadó, women are shaping a new beginning after years of violence Bullets, poverty, and unemployment have taken a big toll on many locations in Colombia.  Take Apartadó, for example—a 167,000 people municipality in northwestern Colombia ravaged by a fierce, decades-old guerrilla war that has forced a large portion of its population to leave. Fully 60 percent of those who have chosen to stay barely scrape a living below the poverty line. 

Banking the Unbanked in Colombia

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Approximately 35 percent of the Colombian adult population has no access to any formal financial services and are considered “unbanked,” according to the Colombian Banking Association. Some 79 percent of adults have no access to credit cards.

IDB seminars in Medellín to discuss impacts of global financial crisis

Monday, March 23, 2009 - 03:00
The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is promoting the discussion and analysis of the impacts of the global financial crisis in Latin America and the Caribbean during seminars in Medellín, Colombia, related to the 50th Annual Meeting of the Bank'sBoard of Governors. The discussions will feature government leaders such as Colombian President Alvaro Uribe, Zhou Xiaochuan and governor of the People’s Bank of China, as well as noted experts such as Robert Merton, a Nobel Prize-winner economist.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Venture capital for low-income markets

Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 03:00
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

When a water meter is worth more than a house

Saturday, July 1, 2006 - 03:00
BARRANQUILLA, COLOMBIA — When a woman in a shantytown calls the water company to complain about a ruptured pipe that is flooding her street, what kind of response should she expect?

A home-grown solution for Latin America’s water crisis

Wednesday, March 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Luis Alberto Moreno*As delegates gathered at the IV World Water Forum in Mexico City earlier this month, many were asking whether the private sector still has a role to play in solving the critical sanitation problems of the developing world.

The day that water ran uphill

Wednesday, February 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Paul ConstanceThey called it the burroducto. Until a few years ago, it was the only source of potable water for tens of thousands of people who live on steep hills overlooking this historic Caribbean city. Informal vendors would use taps in the lower part of the city to fill large cans strapped to the backs of burros. After guiding the animals up dirt tracks and eroded gullies to the shantytowns, the vendors would sell the water for many times what it cost in the rich beachfront neighborhoods connected to the municipal water service.

Latin America moves ahead despite external threats

Monday, October 31, 2005 - 03:00
Many fear the possibility of interest rate hikes and a global recession if the “Chinese addiction” to buying dollars comes to an end, expressed the IDB Chief Economist, Guillermo Calvo. But the seven largest economies in Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela, also known as the LAC-7) are currently growing fast. Stock prices went up 174% in the past two years, bank credit and foreign investment are increasing, and commodity prices have also enjoyed a boost.

The double-edged sword of currency mismatches

Thursday, November 4, 2004 - 03:00
Doing business in dollars has proved to be risky many times over in Latin America. When the price of the dollar goes up, local exporting companies increase their income and therefore try to export more. But that same exchange rate depreciation spells trouble to all companies indebted in dollars, and big trouble to the ones who owe money in dollars and have income in local currency.