Young people with big ideas that transform society

March 14, 2013
Participate and follow us on Twitter using @bidjuventud How does one solve old problems? With new ideas PANAMA CITY – We must listen to the voices of young people, with their fresh ideas and their plans for the future. And especially in Latin America and the Caribbean, the region with the world’s youngest population, where the average age is only 27.

Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

May 30, 2012
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

March 17, 2009
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Women on the challenges of being a scientist in Latin America and the Caribbean

January 16, 2007
Regardless of whether you’re a woman or a man, it’s not easy being a scientist in Latin America or the Caribbean (LAC).  Like anywhere else in the world, from the time one starts university it takes ten years of research and hard work just to earn a PhD in LAC, followed by several years working in postdoctoral fellowship positions.

Improving avenues towards post-secondary and higher education for indigenous people

April 12, 2006
Considering the sheer diversity of indigenous peoples and languages in Ecuador, Colombia, Guatemala and Nicaragua, with 22 different languages spoken among the majority (60 percent) Mayan population in Guatemala alone, it seems logical that terms like multiethnic, multilingual and culturally pluralistic would be used to describe their national compositions.

Getting an early start in life

January 24, 2006
There is ample literature on the impacts of early childhood development (ECD) programs in the US, whether examining small pilot programs, like the Perry Preschool Program, which has been tracking the lives of participants since 1962, or larger-scale initiatives like nationwide Head Start. Whatever the scope of the program, all point to the potential long-term benefits of investing in early childhood development, including higher educational attainment, better employment outcomes, higher earnings and lower levels of criminality.

Using the classroom to fight for peace

January 01, 2006
By Charo QuesadaWhen war, natural disasters, economic crises or violence afflict a society, the education system is usually one of the first institutions to fall into disarray. Yet case after case has shown that in the wake of these disturbances, the presence and continuity of educational programs is crucial to rebuilding the social fabric.

Technology Helped Reducing Inequality Gap

April 21, 2005
A study realized by scholars at the universities of Chicago, Maryland and the Hoover Institution demonstrated that technology is helping reduce inequality in the world. Bary S. Bercker, Tomas J. Philopson, and Rodrigo R. Soares compared “the welfare value of gains in life expectancy with gains in income” to get the “effect of life expectancy on the evolution of world inequality.”

Education can't wait

March 05, 2004
Even in times of war and civil strife, governments, civil society organizations, communities and donor countries must continue to place a high priority on education. The investment will pay off when the inevitable peace process arrives, and society and the country will be in a much better position to heal the wounds of conflict and regain momentum for economic and social development.

The effects of child labor on learning

July 03, 2003
Latin American countries have made a conscious effort to increase the percentage of children receiving formal instruction. Nevertheless, according to the latest household survey statistics, a significant amount of children combine school with work. For instance, in Brazil, Ecuador and Peru, the great majority of children are enrolled in school (95, 87 and 97 percent, respectively), but still a high percentage of children work (13, 34 and 28 percent).