Mayas, the flight through time

Wednesday, December 19, 2012 - 03:00
A new documentary shows how a 3,500-year-old culture remains vibrant in Mesoamerica When the Mayan people abandoned their cities of gleaming limestone in the 9th century AD, they took with them something far more enduring than monuments: They took their culture.  Over the centuries, as the forest reclaimed these vast temple complexes, the descendents of this great civilization continued to speak their ancestral languages, find meaning in the same cosmology, and even eat the same foods. 

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 03:00
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Innovation is the key to sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 03:00
The countries of Latin America and the Caribbean are making comparatively low investments in research and development, and the region’s private sector is also comparatively under-represented in R&D spending, according to a new study by the Inter-American Development Bank. Through a comparative analysis of R&D investments in developed countries, the study, entitled “The need to innovate,” concludes that companies in Latin America and the Caribbean have favored technology procurement strategies instead of promote endogenous generation of technology and new ideas.

Mesoamerica renews push towards integration

Monday, October 25, 2010 - 03:00
The presidents of Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Colombia and the Dominican Republic will meet tomorrow, Oct. 26, in Cartagena, Colombia at the XII Summit of the Tuxtla Mechanism for Dialogue and Coordination. The heads of state will be informed of the progress made by the Mesoamerica Project in terms of regional integration and will decide further courses of action.

Ministers call for more financial and institutional support for culture industries in Latin America and the Caribbean

Tuesday, October 19, 2010 - 03:00
Cultural industries are one of the fastest-growing sectors of the global economy, expanding at a projected rate of 8-10 percent over the coming decade. What does that mean for Latin America and the Caribbean?   The region has rich cultural heritage and dynamic cultural industries which continue to grow. But are countries doing enough to exploit the social and economic potential of the creative sector for development?

IDB study looks at export agency effectiveness

Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 03:00
Latin American and Caribbean export agencies have succeeded in supporting the diversification and expansion of exports but could be more effective, a new study by the Inter-American Development Bank shows.

Natural disaster risks remain high in Latin American and the Caribbean, IDB says

Thursday, September 30, 2010 - 03:00
Latin America and the Caribbean face potentially crippling economic and social costs from natural disasters and needs to do more to reduce risks and prepare government finances to respond to eventual catastrophes, according to a new set of indicators by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

Young Agents of Change

Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 03:00
When Rodrigo Hucke-Gaete, a Chilean, was in his twenties, he decided to protect the blue whale, this magnificent and endangered marine mammal. With the support of other young people, the marine biologist began a struggle that continues today to ensure that the Chilean government declared the coastal waters south of the country a protected area. "Things are changing", says a satisfied Hucke-Gaete.

Central America's integration is in full swing

Wednesday, July 21, 2010 - 03:00
In late July, the first substation of the Central American Electrical Interconnection System (SIEPAC) is opening in Costa Rica. A week later, the substation in Panama will be ready to operate. Towers, lines and cables are already in place, so the southern section of the nascent Central American electricity market will soon be a reality. PAC53 - Road from La Chorrera to Arraijan, in Panama.

IDB study suggests large natural disasters unlikely to affect long-term growth

Friday, June 18, 2010 - 03:00
Large natural disasters are unlikely to affect long-term economic growth unless they are followed by a radical disruption in the institutional organization of society, a new study by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) suggests. The study, which analyses the impact of large natural disasters, sheds new light on whether these occurrences hurt long run economic growth. Current economic theories do not offer a clear answer.