Women Forge a Future for Apartadó

Monday, March 3, 2014 - 03:00
In the Colombian town of Apartadó, women are shaping a new beginning after years of violence Bullets, poverty, and unemployment have taken a big toll on many locations in Colombia.  Take Apartadó, for example—a 167,000 people municipality in northwestern Colombia ravaged by a fierce, decades-old guerrilla war that has forced a large portion of its population to leave. Fully 60 percent of those who have chosen to stay barely scrape a living below the poverty line. 

Young people with big ideas that transform society

Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 03:00
Participate and follow us on Twitter using @bidjuventud How does one solve old problems? With new ideas PANAMA CITY – We must listen to the voices of young people, with their fresh ideas and their plans for the future. And especially in Latin America and the Caribbean, the region with the world’s youngest population, where the average age is only 27.

Banking the Unbanked in Colombia

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Approximately 35 percent of the Colombian adult population has no access to any formal financial services and are considered “unbanked,” according to the Colombian Banking Association. Some 79 percent of adults have no access to credit cards.

Mayas, the flight through time

Wednesday, December 19, 2012 - 03:00
A new documentary shows how a 3,500-year-old culture remains vibrant in Mesoamerica When the Mayan people abandoned their cities of gleaming limestone in the 9th century AD, they took with them something far more enduring than monuments: They took their culture.  Over the centuries, as the forest reclaimed these vast temple complexes, the descendents of this great civilization continued to speak their ancestral languages, find meaning in the same cosmology, and even eat the same foods. 

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 03:00
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 03:00
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

IDB fuels impact investing in Latin America

Monday, February 13, 2012 - 03:00
More than $110 million of impact investing resources were mobilized by the IDB over the past 18 months to finance profitable projects that bring about social change Despite stellar economic performance in recent years, Latin America and the Caribbean still have a long way to go to address pressing development needs, such as reducing poverty, improving educational outcomes and enhancing access to reliable health services.

Women entrepreneurs: too often trapped in the microenterprise ghetto

Wednesday, October 5, 2011 - 03:00
Innovative approaches can boost women’s economic presence among small business owners in Latin America and the Caribbean Over the past three decades, women in Latin America and the Caribbean have dramatically increased their role in the workforce. Currently, about half of women in the region are economically active, more than double the level in the 1970s. They have been elected presidents of several Latin American countries and often dominate the microenterprise and microfinance sector, providing an important contribution to regional economies.

IDB study examines potential for Brazil-Colombia integration

Wednesday, August 3, 2011 - 03:00
Beyond a boom that has pushed bilateral trade between Colombia and Brazil to $3 billion a year, both countries could tap enormous potential for growth if they addressed bottlenecks such as logistical costs and tariff barriers, according to a new study released by the Inter-American Development Bank’s Integration Department.

Lesson on remittances

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 03:00
Two IDB experiments shed light on policies to increase savings and remittances of migrants Remittances from migrants bring substantial benefits for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, a review by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) shows. Money sent home increases consumption, investments and lowers poverty rates. However, little has been done to gather evidence on how to increase these beneficial transfers.