Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 03:00
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

Latin America and the Caribbean see slower growth in next four years

Thursday, March 19, 2009 - 03:00
Latin American and Caribbean leaders expect per capita income to fall or grow moderately in the 2009–2012  period and governments to rely more on financing from international institutions, according to a survey by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The expectations contrast sharply with the recent economic performance in the region, where product per capita grew 4.1 percent annually in the past five years.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Protecting the Little Guy

Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 03:00
What does the international promotion video of ChileCompra—the Chilean government’s web portal for public announcements of competitive bids—have in common with Peruvian police boots or with a stream of government contracts in the Bolivian city of Oruro? These are all cases of microenterprises participating in public bidding and competing with the big traditional suppliers.

More growth or less inequality?

Tuesday, September 20, 2005 - 03:00
Increased investment, low inflation, an improved fiscal situation, decreased unemployment. Latin America and the Caribbean have been hearing plenty of good news the past 18 months. A group of renowned economists analyzed the situation at a seminar hosted by the IDB Research Department to honor IDB President Enrique V. Iglesias, who will retire on September 30. Iglesias himself opened the seminar, which was chaired by IDB Chief Economist Guillermo Calvo, with the participation of Ricardo Hausmann, Michael Mussa, José Antonio Ocampo and John Williamson.

Racial and ethnic disparities in health in Latin America

Tuesday, May 3, 2005 - 03:00
Are Afro-descendants and indigenous peoples in better or worse health than Latin Americans of European descent? Four new studies on race, ethnicity and health in Latin America produced some unexpected and sometimes contradictory results. In poor rural villages in Mexico, for instance, indigenous groups report being in better health than non-indigenous groups, said Ashu Handa, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He took data from the PROGRESA cash transfer program for the poor and compared it with the National Health Survey findings.

Partnering Japan and Latin America

Tuesday, May 11, 2004 - 03:00
Japan and Latin America and the Caribbean look to reinforce relationships when high-ranking officers from their public and private sectors meet at the Japan – Latin America and the Caribbean Global Partnership symposium this week in Tokyo. The symposium aims to increase mutual knowledge and new forms of partnership at a time when Japan is exploring new global trade and investment opportunities, and Latin American is pursuing greater trade liberalization, regional integration and insertion into the global economy.

Policy recommendations for mobile telephony development in Latin America

Wednesday, June 25, 2003 - 03:00
Policy makers should promote interconnection regulation through a model contract for all players, exclusion of fixed-line carriers when possible, and unlimited market entry instead of exclusive licenses to develop mobile telephony in Latin America, according to a working paper recently published by the Inter-American Development Bank's Research Department.