Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 03:00
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

Local culture, global attraction

Monday, May 1, 2006 - 03:00
Imagine a poor country that needs tourist dollars, but doesn’t have beaches, glitzy casinos or theme parks. What attractions can it offer? If the country is Bolivia, attractions are not the problem. Its vibrant indigenous cultures, rich history and majestic landscapes step right out of the pages of National Geographic magazine.

No beaches? No worry

Monday, May 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Roger HamiltonImagine a poor country that needs tourist dollars, but doesn’t have beaches, glitzy casinos or theme parks. What attractions can it offer? If the country is Bolivia, attractions are not the problem. Its vibrant indigenous cultures, rich history and majestic landscapes step right out of the pages of National Geographic magazine.

Latinos from the Far East

Wednesday, March 1, 2006 - 03:00
By Charo QuesadaWhen Mexicans or Panamanians say they are “going to the Chino for groceries” they are not talking about some Chinese individual that happened to open a business around the corner from where they live. In their countries, the Chinese store has become an institution with a long tradition, providing a large and convenient selection of basic products, at low cost and with convenient business hours.

Where Asian culture meets Latin & Caribbean culture

Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 03:00
Inter-American Development Bank President Enrique V. Iglesias and Integration and Regional Program Department Manager Nohra Rey de Marulanda inaugurated the Contemporary Japanese Garden “Contemporary Karesansui,” located on the Terrace of the new IDB conference center, on September 28. The conference center was opened earlier this year in order to accommodate IDB business meetings more efficiently while undertaking activities in association with the greater metropolitan DC community. 

Latin American art with Japanese roots

Tuesday, February 1, 2005 - 03:00
By Roger HamiltonThe Japanese immigrants who swept into Latin America at the turn of the 20th century were no different than those of other origins. Poor, out of opportunities and often out of luck, they saw the Americas as a land of hope and opportunity. Most of the newcomers were farmers, and they were content to work on plantations, first in Peru, and then in other countries, primarily Brazil. Many hoped that after a few years they could return to their homeland. Most remained.

Art of everyday life

Wednesday, September 8, 2004 - 03:00
In the Andean region and in the valleys and lowlands of Bolivia, different cultures produce folk art of great beauty and extraordinary quality. Folk art in developing countries such as Bolivia is created for use in daily life. More elaborate objects are used for rituals, worship, festivals, and celebrations. Folk art responds to common beliefs and collective imagination.