IDB study examines potential for Brazil-Colombia integration

Wednesday, August 3, 2011 - 03:00
Beyond a boom that has pushed bilateral trade between Colombia and Brazil to $3 billion a year, both countries could tap enormous potential for growth if they addressed bottlenecks such as logistical costs and tariff barriers, according to a new study released by the Inter-American Development Bank’s Integration Department.

The IDB, a partner of Colombia in development

Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:00
Since the mid-1990s the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has been the leading source of multilateral financing for Colombia. Over the last 50 years, the IDB has approved more than US$14.8 billion in loans and non-refundable technical cooperation projects for Colombia. Throughout its history, the IDB has supported the Colombian government and private sector in key development areas such as infrastructure, state modernization and reform, small and medium enterprise, agriculture, energy, climate change and environmental protection.

The Big Bad Wolf?

Thursday, December 20, 2007 - 03:00
By Diego Fonseca   While Central America is nervous about CAFTA, the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) has rattled countries with large economies, such as Brazil and Argentina. And although the most recent negotiations, in late 2003 and early 2004, didn’t produce agreement on major issues such as agricultural subsidies, government procurement and intellectual property rights, January 1, 2005, continues to be the apparent date for the birth of the FTAA, which may, like beer, come in a robust version or a “lite” version.

Trade in ethanol will benefit the U.S. and Latin America

Wednesday, February 7, 2007 - 03:00
By calling for the United States to use 35 billion gallons of renewable fuels by 2017, President Bush focused attention on a question that has been largely absent from the debate about ethanol, the most widely used biofuel. Namely, should the U.S. go it alone on ethanol?

Andean integration: Myths or realities?

Monday, September 12, 2005 - 03:00
While three of the five Andean countries—Colombia, Ecuador and Peru—are participating actively in the free trade agreement negotiations to promote commerce and investment between the United States and the Andean Community, the recent celebration of the Ninth Annual Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF) Conference served to reflect on the differences within the subregion and the positions held by the two other Andean countries, which abstained from taking part in the negotiations. Bolivia plays only the role of an observer, while Venezuela is skeptical of the proposed model.

A marriage of convenience

Thursday, March 24, 2005 - 03:00
The global market economy, now embracing over 5 billion people, is ready for a marriage between Latin America and Japan, according to Makoto Utsumi, President and CEO of the Japan Credit Rating Agency, Ltd.

Partnering Japan and Latin America

Tuesday, May 11, 2004 - 03:00
Japan and Latin America and the Caribbean look to reinforce relationships when high-ranking officers from their public and private sectors meet at the Japan – Latin America and the Caribbean Global Partnership symposium this week in Tokyo. The symposium aims to increase mutual knowledge and new forms of partnership at a time when Japan is exploring new global trade and investment opportunities, and Latin American is pursuing greater trade liberalization, regional integration and insertion into the global economy.

Secretary general of the Andean Community visits IDB

Wednesday, March 3, 2004 - 03:00
The secretary general of the Andean Community, Allan Wagner, visited the Inter-American Development Bank to discuss trade issues with IDB President Enrique V. Iglesias and to explore ways the two organizations can work closer together in promoting integration. The IDB - through technical assistance, financing, and other activities - assists the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean so they will be better prepared to negotiate international trade agreements.

The multinational effect

Wednesday, January 21, 2004 - 03:00
Many people make the quick assumption that multinational firms’ investment is linked with negative economic effects in the host country, or reject the hypothesis that foreign direct investment accelerates productivity growth in domestic firms.

Taxes and Trade

Thursday, October 16, 2003 - 03:00
One surefire way to increase the competitiveness of a country’s exports in global markets is to make its tax system amenable to businesses—and especially to manufacturers of products and providers of services in which the country has a competitive advantage. Unfortunately, designing the ‘perfect’ tax structure isn’t easy, even on the national level. Policymakers must devise a system that raises enough tax revenues to finance public expenditures without sacrificing the nation’s competitiveness.