Brazil’s Fisherwomen Mean Business

Friday, March 7, 2014 - 03:00
In Vila Castelo, a small town in the Brazilian state of Pará, fisherwomen are learning the ropes of fiscal management and entrepreneurship  Traditional fishing does not differ much today from what it has been since biblical times—a boat, a net, and a few men. Wait. Men? Maybe it has changed after all. At least in Vila Castelo, a tiny fishing village in Brazil’s state of Pará, women fish alongside men. 

Finding Ways to Change Eating Habits in Bolivia

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Nearly one in three children under the age of five in Bolivia suffers from stunting—a result of chronic malnutrition—the second highest rate in Latin America and the Caribbean. Poverty and lack of health systems that provide the right supplements are the most commonly cited reasons for the problem, but lack of awareness and behavioral issues related to nutrition are factors as well.

Manaus: From Stilts to Dry Land

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 03:00
Changing the Lives of Families in Brazil's Amazon

Latin American and Caribbean Women: Better Educated, Lower Paid

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 03:00
Even with more education than men, women are still concentrated in lower-paid occupations such as teaching, health care or the service sector. When comparing men and women of the same age and educational level, men earn 17 percent more than women in Latin America.

Rubber tappers in the Brazilian Amazon discover the value of sustainable management

Tuesday, June 19, 2012 - 03:00
Communities diversify income through increased access to new techniques that promote better use of natural resources and less deforestation

Civic culture is key to reduce violence, study finds

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 03:00
IDB-sponsored study explores how changes in civic culture are needed to achieve long-term success in mitigating violence Any successful strategy to prevent violence should include measures to recognize and change behaviors prompted by beliefs, emotions and cultural factors, according to a new study sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

IDB ramps up financing for green projects in Latin America and the Caribbean

Friday, March 16, 2012 - 03:00
Participate in Twitter using #IDBmtg Bank approved record $736 million in loans last year for private sector projects in renewable energy and energy efficiency The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is ramping up lending for private sector projects related to renewable energy and energy efficiency to help bridge the gap for long-term financing for green investments in Latin America and the Caribbean.

A capital challenge in Haiti

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 03:00
Until February 2011, Jean-Claude Seropian, a French hydraulic engineer, worked in Paris as director of operations of Suez Environnement, one of the world’s leading water and waste management companies. That month he moved to Haiti as head of a team of five technical, financial and management experts from Suez and two sister companies, Aguas de Barcelona and United Water. Their mission: to work with the staff of Port-au-Prince’s ailing water utility to arrest the decline of its services.

A water turnaround in Haiti

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 03:00
Before the project started in 2008, Saint Marc had running water for nine hours a week, at best. At present service is up to 10 hours a day—the highest average in any urban area in Haiti.

A small price to pay

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 03:00
GOMIER, Haiti – Danette François used to walk 30 minutes to fetch water from a well in this seaside village. The water was free but brackish and untreated. Her children often fell ill. She now spends a few minutes each day to fill a 5-gallon bucket of chlorinated water, paying a community-established fee of one gourde— the equivalent of two cents. “The price? It’s really cheap, like a gift,” said François, who has five children between the ages of 10 and 4. “I’m happy. My kids are not getting sick.”