IDB fuels impact investing in Latin America

Monday, February 13, 2012 - 03:00
More than $110 million of impact investing resources were mobilized by the IDB over the past 18 months to finance profitable projects that bring about social change Despite stellar economic performance in recent years, Latin America and the Caribbean still have a long way to go to address pressing development needs, such as reducing poverty, improving educational outcomes and enhancing access to reliable health services.

Improving housing conditions in Paraguay

Monday, June 27, 2011 - 03:00
An innovative way of allowing low-income families to afford home improvements

Increased opportunities for higher education

Monday, June 27, 2011 - 03:00
Mexico's FINAE to expand student loan offerings, allowing more low-income students to get degrees and training that will lead to better jobs and brighter futures College degrees are hard to obtain in Mexico, especially for students from low-income families. Public universities have been unable to meet demand and many aspiring students do not earn enough to pay for tuition at private universities. As a result, only one in four Mexicans between the ages of 19 and 24 is enrolled in college—a number that drops to one in 30 for young people at the base of the pyramid.

IDB backs base-of-the-pyramid business models in Latin America and the Caribbean

Wednesday, March 9, 2011 - 03:00
Projects aim to boost income and improve quality of life of low-income people with companies, governments and NGOs The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is teaming up with companies, governments and non-governmental organizations in novel projects to generate new business models that provide low-income people in Latin America and the Caribbean with quality goods and services, improved earning opportunities and enhanced living standards.

Venture capital for low-income markets

Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 03:00
Investing in housing, healthcare, education, basic utilities and nutrition can not only fulfill a social mission, but it can also be a profitable business venture. This is the concept of IGNIA Fund, which will channel venture capital resources to fund commercially viable growth companies serving the “base of the pyramid,” those persons in Latin America and the Caribbean earning less than $3,260 a year. The IGNIA Fund selects projects with the potential to be expanded on a larger scale, thereby increasing the social and economic impact.

Self-help for the poor through microcredit

Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 03:00
Microenterprise and small business companies account for 59 percent of El Salvador’s work force and 49 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product. Yet the vast majority of these firms, particularly those with small incomes and in rural areas, do not have access to credit. Experience has demonstrated that properly managed microcredit programs can achieve an adequate return on capital while fulfilling a social need, enabling low-income producers to survive and expand.

A new way to pave city streets

Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 03:00
Throughout Latin America low-income neighborhoods have difficulty in paving city streets. Municipalities are typically short of funds, and many informal urban settlements have not yet been properly incorporated into the tax base. An innovative solution has been devised by CEMEX, a multinational cement company based in Mexico, to mobilize both public and private resources to pave streets in low-income neighborhoods.

Empowering poor people to create wealth

Friday, June 23, 2006 - 03:00
When asked by IDB President Moreno what advice he would give to a newly elected Latin American President, Bill Clinton said that the most important thing would be to carry out microeconomic reforms to help people become entrepreneurs and move into the middle class, without getting bogged down in yesterday’s debate over fiscal responsibility versus unbridled social spending, neither of which have managed to lessen the world’s largest income gap.

Jamaica’s New Prime Minister Committed to Reaching the Majority

Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:00
Jamaican Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller, the first woman to lead her country’s government, plans to invest more in early childhood education, basic shelter and job training to help improve the lives of the disadvantaged in her island nation.

Laptops for the Majority

Friday, June 16, 2006 - 03:00
What’s the best way to move entire towns from poverty to the middle class? Buy each and every child in the community a $100 laptop computer, said MIT professor Nicholas Negroponte at a recent conference launching the IDB’s new Building Opportunity for the Majority initiative. Negroponte is also founder and chair of One Laptop per Child (OLPC), a non-profit organization that is working on developing these $100 laptops for low-income children around the world.